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LONDON CORRESPONDENCE.

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THE EASTERN QUESTION., 1

WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

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FAILURE OF CITY BANKERS.1

O'DONOVAN ROSSA AGAIN.

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PARLIAMENTARY INTELLIGENCE.

ARRIVALS OF SPRING BIRDS.

HUMAN FLESH SAUSAGES.I

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THE ASSASSINATIONS IN IRELAND.…

THE DOG QUESTION IN THE COMMONS.

CLAIM FOR DAMAGES.

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PROPOSED POST ADVERTISING…

INCITING TO FIGHT A DUEL.

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INCITING TO FIGHT A DUEL. At Lewes, Malcolm Frbser, formerly an officer in the Royal Sussex Artillery Militia, was brought up on a bill of indictment found against him on the previous day by the grand jury at the Quarter Sessions—that he bad in a letter incited Francis Barry Whitfield, banker, of Lewes, to fight a duel. Mr. Langham, for the prosecution, said that the prisoner was formerly an officer in the Sussex Militia Artillery stationed at Lewes. He was introduced to Mr. Whit- field's family, and seemed to have formed an attach- ment to Miss Edith Whitfield, the prosecutor's sister. That courtship was conducted in a clandestine manner. When it came to the knowledge of Mr. Whitfield he at once endeavoured to put a stop to it by expressing his serious disapproval. This, however, was not sufficient bar to the prisoner's communication with MissWhitfield. The correspondence was kept up on prisoner's part by all sorts of disgraceful and clandestine means. Once he disguised himself as a rustic, wearing a smock frock. On that occasion the prisoner's behaviour was such that he was apprehended by the police. At the time that the prisoner had heen carrying on the correspon- dence with Miss Whitfield he had been associated with the daughter of an innkeeper at Lewes, to whom he was married, in June, 1876. The wife was still living, but was belieTed to be separated from the p i- soner. It might be charitably thought the prisoner was out of his mind, but the deliberate and per- sistent manner in which be had acted forbade this conclusion. Even in his letters he stated that he was married, and yet asked Miss Whitfield to go away with him. For three years Mr. Whitfield's family had been persecuted by the prisoner. Spies had been em- ployed by him, and wherever Miss Whitfield went he was sure to follow her. In a letter dated the 30th of January, 1877, be asked Miss Whitfield to go away with him, adding, I call God to witness I would rather see you dear!, killed by my own hand, than believe for one moment that you cease to love me." The challenge to a duel was soon afterwards given to the lady's brother. The prisoner was committed for trial, bail being accepted in two sureties of X300 each and the prisoner in £600.

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THE KAFFIR WAR.

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