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.-THE TERCENTENARY OF HARVEY.

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ERUPTION OF MOUNT HECLA.

A REMARKABLE CASE.

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THE AUSTRIAN ARMY.

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RUSSIAN VIEWS OF WAR WITHj…

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RUSSIAN VIEWS OF WAR WITH j ENGLAND. The St. Petersburg correspondent of the Times says: The attitude assumed by the British Govern- ment and the warlike preparations which are being made on such a large scale in England have pro- duced here the conviction that the negotiations for a Congress are a mere pretext for gaining time and that war is inevitable. Already this conviction is expressed both in private and in public, and amateur strategists have begun to publish their views as to how the war should be conducted. In all reasonings on this subject it is assumed that Austria will remain neutral, and that the struggle will be exclusively between England and Russia. Accordingly, the war will have a very peculiar character. The whale, as Prince Bismarck is reported to have said, cannot well fight with the elephant, and, consequently, if a war should break out between Russia and England it can- not be a series of great battles or great naval engage- ments. England will not send into Russia an army of invasion, and Russi i will not send out her fleet to the high seas. How, then, can the two nations carry on war with each other, supposing they wish to do so ? To this question a writer in the Novoe Vremya gives a lengthy reply, which may be summarised thus: It is impossible for our troops to make their way to England, and consequently we could not attempt an offensive campaign in the ordinary sense, but on the other hand to restrict ourselves to purely defensive operations would be very disadvantageous. England would at once close all our ports, and might by land- ing troops and bombarding now at one place and now at another inflict upon the country very considerable injury. Without any serious loss, and even without any great expenditure, she could continue this mode of warfare for an indefinite period, and we should in the long run be forced to come to terms. Such would be the inevitable result of a purely defensive plan of operations if we were compelled to adopt it. Fortu nately for us, however, we have other means at our disposal, and we may easily, though we have no great fleet, assume the offensive. England has two weak points—her maritime trade and her Indian pos- sessions. To destroy the British commercial fleet and to drive the English out of India would be for England a blow from which she would never recover." As to the feasibility of an Indian expedition opinion is divided. Some people think that for soldiers who forced the passage of the Balkans in winter nothing is impossible, and that 100,000 of these heroes led by Skobeleff could easily make their way to the fertile valley of the Ganges. Those who hold this view do not take the trouble to study geographical conditions or to use large maps. Assuming as a principle beyond all doubt that Russian soldiers can do anything possible or impossible they arrive safely at this conclusion as a matter of course. Those who have less faith and more knowledge hold a somewhat different opinion. Admitting that in the abstract an invasion of India is possible, they declare that it would bean extremely difficult, hazardous, and costly undertaking. This view is ably stated by a M. Skalkovski, who has been in India and who seems to have studied the subject.

THE CALLING OUT OF THE RESERVES.

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HOW THE GREEh. INSURRECTION…

5 BREACH OF PROMISE CASES.

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THE MILITARY SITUATION IN…

THE CHANGES IN THE CABINET.

TURKISH REFUGEES.

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THE BURNING OF THE SPHINX.

DEPUTATIONS TO LORD GRANVILLE…

ON BOARD HOBART PASHA'S FLAG-…

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