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.-THE TERCENTENARY OF HARVEY.

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ERUPTION OF MOUNT HECLA.

A REMARKABLE CASE.

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THE AUSTRIAN ARMY.

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BONNETS IN STALLS.—THBATMCAL CASE.— At the Shorediteh County Court, Judge Dasent, pre- siding, Mr. 0. H. Tennant, sued Mr. John Douglass, proprietor of the Standard Theatre, for £1 for breach of contract. Mr. St. John Wontner represented the plaintiff, and said that a few weeks ago his client, accompanied by two ladies, went to defendant's theatre and purchased three stall tickets. On their way to the stalls the boxkeeper said that the ladies must first go to the cloak-room, where they were re- quired to deposit their bonnets, for the care of which a small fee was demanded. Plaintiff not only refused to pay the fee, but contested the right of the manager to make such a regulation. Eventually, however, he agreed that the ladies should not wear their bonnets in the stalls, but should hold them in their hands. This the boxkeeper refused to allow. Plaintiff thereupon saw the proprietor, who also re- fused admission till the bonnets were given up, but offered to remit the fee. To this the plaintiff would not Agree. As he was retiring the defendant offered to return the ticket money, but he refused to accept it. The case was then taken before the magistrate at Worship Etreet Police-court, who said be was unable to afford the plaintiff any redress. In bringing the case before the county court, Mr. Wontner contended that the defendant bad no right to enforce such a regulation or impose a fee, which he felt certain would never be authorised by the Lord Chamberlain. The plaintiff had taken the matter up on public grounds, and for these reasons he asked for a verdict in favour of his client. The judge said a notice had been hung up in different parts of the theatre, informing the public that in certain parts of the house "No bonnets were admitted;" but, apart from this, the defendant had a perfect right, in his opinion, to make the restriction in question. Judg- ment was given for the defendant. A THEATRICAL CASE.—At the Leeds Assizes an action was tried for breach of a contract to let the Drill Hall at Keighley to a theatrical company. The plaintiff was Mr. F. A. Seudamore, formerly manager of Herr Bandmann's Scarborough company and the defendant is a bank manager and com- mandant of the Keighley Bifle Corps. In October last year, seeing an advertisement that the Keighley Drill Hall was to let for theatrical purposes, the plaintiff applied to Mr. Cooke, the agent, for terms. Eventually he engaged the hall for three months, commencing Saturday, the 4th of Novem- ber, at six guineas a week, and paid one week's rent in advance. Next he engaged a stock com- pany, and opened on the night named with the play of "Ambition." In the meantime, however, he bad placed £ 270 in the defendant's bank, and the defendant wished him to enter into an agreement to allow him to attach the balance of this sum for any rent which might become due. The plaintiff refused to enter into such an agreement, and the following Tuesday the defendant sent his drill sergeant, M'Grath, who enticed the plaintiff's carpenters out of the hall, and then locked the door in their faces. The plaintiff was therefore unable to proceed with his performance that night, and was obliged to take his company to Burnley, where, instead of making a profit, he sus- tained a serious loss, for which he now claimed com- pensation. After the case had been opened the counsel held a consultation, the upshot of which was that a verdict for the plaintiff, by consent, for £75, was come to. THE FATAL AFFRAY AT A WEDDING PARTY. -At the Notts Assizes the five men named Hollings- worth, Wilkinson, Attewell, Drayton, and Law, were found guilty of the manslaughter of Patrick Duffy, at Greaaley, during a quarrel at a wedding party, and Lord J ustiee Bramwell sentenced each of them to four months' imprisonment with hard labour. DESPERATE POACHING AURAY. — At the Chester Assizes, James Dean, William Dean, Charles Dean, John Langley, and William Hughes were charged with night poaching, and with wounding three keepers named- Shave, Talbot, and Davies, on the Duke of Westminster's estate at Baton, on the 12th of September. The three keepers. with another named Foster, met at nine o'clock at Bretton Drive, and, hearing a hare scream, crossed a plantation into a field, where they saw two men drawing a net. The men first ran away, but on being joined by two others they turned and attacked the keepers, who fol- lowed, with stones. Shave, Talbot, and Davies were each struck with stones, but they rushed at the men, and each struggled with one of them. Shave was struck several times on the body and head with a heavy stick, and eventually fell to the ground insensible. Talbot was similarly treated and Davies, in addition to being beaten with a stick, was struck with some sharp-pointed weapon, which made a hole through his clothes, and inflicted a punctured wound in his chest. The poachers got away, after having killed bystaobing with long spears, two large mastiffs which the keepers had with them! but they left behind them a number of articles and two dogs, which helped to identify them. The keepers positively swore to the identity of four of the prisoners The defence was an alibi, which was proved by about a dozen witnesses. The jury foupd Charles and James Dean and Hughes guilty, and they were sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment with hard labour. Langley and William Dean were found not guilty. i PUBLIC BUILDINGS IN INDIA.-Lord North- brook, the late Governor General of India, was ex- amined before the Indian Public Works Committee in connection with the amount expended on Government buildings in India as compared with the taxation which the country could fitl* bear for that purpose His opinions were that but a moderate sum should be borrowed from public works, so as not to embarrass bhe financial forecasts of succeeding years, that iuch money ought to be raised in India, and that ;he irrigation works should be prudently forwarded n which case there would be no occasion for fresh ;axation. CHINESE LADIES AT THE PARIS EXHIBITION. -Twelve young ladies from the Celestial Empire will erve behind the counters of the Cbiseaa section of the French Exhibition. They are reported young and iretty. These Chinese counters will undoubtedly prove a attraction* a attraction*

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