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.-THE TERCENTENARY OF HARVEY.

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ERUPTION OF MOUNT HECLA.

A REMARKABLE CASE.

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A REMARKABLE CASE. AN HEIR FOUND—A PROPERTY LOST. In the Court of Chancery the cise of Moreton v. Leather came before Vice-Ohancellor Sir James Bacon. This was a most remarkable case. Some years since the will of Samuel Holland Moreton, of Liverpool, was declared to be invalid, it having been proved that the signature to the will, though sworn to be his, was not his own, but that his hand had been guided after his death. Thereupon it became necessary to And the nearest heir to Samuel Holland Moreton's property, and in June, 1872, it was discovered that the plaintiff James Moreton, a wheelwright of Liverpool, was such heir. The value of the property was between £15,000 and £18,000. James Moreton was discovered by Charles Stanyer, a plasterer, of Chester, who, noticing the advertise- ments inquiring for the heir-at-law and having con- nections by marriage of the name of Moreton, took great pains to trace the pedigree of the inteatate, and to find the link between it and the pedigree of his own connections. Shortly afterwards, the defendant, Joseph Leather, a, v terinary surgeon, at Liverpool, employing John Moreton, the plaintiff's brother, made the acquain- tance of the plaintiff, and according to the plain- tiff's story told him things were not being done right and offered to be his friend and act as his agent in the matter. He introduced him to new solicitors, Messrs. Smith, Williams, and Quiggin, of Liverpool, of whom Mr. Quiggin (a co-defendant) was the survivor, and the plaintiff put himself into the hands of Joseph Leather and Mr. Quiggin, in whose hands the plaintiff's property melted away to nothing, and in accounts which they induced the plaintiff to sign, and which he now sought to reopen, they made charges to an enormous amount for journeys, for repairs, for law ex- penses, and other matters which appeared to exhaust the whole of the plaintiff's income. Leather had told him that the property was bringing in very little, and he could only pay him S3 a week, which was afterwards reduced to £2, and then .ei 10a., and finally (tc use the Vice-Chancellor's words in his judgment) the fairy gifts faded away and he woke from his drea-u to find himself a journeyman shipwright again." The plaintiff bad sold part-executed mortgages on other parts of his property to the defendants, and had agreed to several bills of costs which he now asked to have referred to taxation. The plaintiff, who appeared a simple, illiterate person, gave evidence that Joseph Leather prevented him from going to a solicitor on his own account by telling him that he would be charged 6s. 8d. every time he went into the office, and in the Vice-Chancel- lor's opinion his evidence showed that he bad been entirely under the dominion of the defendants and had had no competent independent advice. The Vice-Chancellor in a long-written judgment reviewed the evidence and came to the conclusion that the settled accounts must bo reopened and the solici- tors' bills taxed, and the sales and mortgages must, stand only as a security for moneys properly advanced and remuneration properly due to the defendants for service rendered by them, on the ground that the de- fendants had taken advantage of the plaintiff's ignorance and had exercised an undue influence over him and must be considered as having acted through- out as his agents and as being in a fiduciary position towards him.

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THE AUSTRIAN ARMY.

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RUSSIAN VIEWS OF WAR WITHj…

THE CALLING OUT OF THE RESERVES.

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HOW THE GREEh. INSURRECTION…

5 BREACH OF PROMISE CASES.

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THE MILITARY SITUATION IN…

THE CHANGES IN THE CABINET.

TURKISH REFUGEES.

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THE BURNING OF THE SPHINX.

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ON BOARD HOBART PASHA'S FLAG-…

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