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" PEDESTRIAN COMPETITION.j

,TRADE OUTRAGE TRIAL.

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THE FOUR 100-TON GUNS PURCHASE.…

COLLIERY ACCIDENT CASE. j

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GflAZI OSMAN'S KNTRY INTO…

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DASHING EXPLOITS.

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NATIVE RACES IN CHINà. í

A HERO OF THE COMMUNE.

THE BATTLE OF MONASTERO. f

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THE DEAF AND DUMn AT BOARD…

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THE DEAF AND DUMn AT BOARD SCHOOLS. | From a report of the Load on Board Sciiofl ] Management Co. mititfjust-iaaued it appears, says tU8 .j Globe, that the oral system of teaching the deaf and dumb hps made some advance in the opinion of the Board of late. The earlier efforts of Mr- Stainer, the instructor of this unfortunate section of Board School pupils, were confined to the manual j system of communication. The work in this depart- ment grows upon the Board, however, the number of children in attendance during the Ipst quarter having been larger than in any previous quarter, j and of course a greater variety of cases is presented. There are now 126 children under the care of Mr. Stainer, brought together to four centres in the north, south, east, and west of London, and by adopting the oral system as well as the manual provision is made for every variety of case. These cases generally come under the headings, it appears, of the deaf-uot- ■ dumb," the dumb-not-deaf," and the deaf-and- dumb," though occasionally there are children presented for admission who can scarcely be classed under any one of these categories. The case of a girl recently excused by a magistrate from attendance at an ordinary Board School on account of deafness is given as an instance. She is not dumb, but too deaf to take part in the work of an ordinary schooL Being able to speak, there is of course no necessity for her learning to express ideas by her fingers, and if she can be taught lip reading it will to a great extent compensate for her deafness. There are many drawbacks te this lip-reading, unfortunately. It takes a long time for most children to learn it, and there are of course many words and parts of words which do not appear on the lips at all. Moreover, the exercise of the voice without the control of the ear is often found to be a singularly painful and unpleasant thing to hear. Still, for many cases the oral system of teaching the deaf and dumb, or those who are commonly regarded as such, is undoubtedly valuable. There is a good deal yet to be done in providing for this afflicted class. With 126 children on the books there are, according to the report before us, more than twice that number yet unprovided for," and a now centre for the south-western district is suggested.

THE DREADFUL FAMINE IN CHINA.

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