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" PEDESTRIAN COMPETITION.j

,TRADE OUTRAGE TRIAL.

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THE FOUR 100-TON GUNS PURCHASE.…

COLLIERY ACCIDENT CASE. j

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GflAZI OSMAN'S KNTRY INTO…

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DASHING EXPLOITS.

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DASHING EXPLOITS. The Times oj India says: The dasking exploit of Captain Oavagnari at Sapri with the gallant Guides, and their leader Captain Wigram Baitye, is by no means a solitary episode of the kind in the career of this distinguished frontier official. In August last year he directed the attack and surprise of the Gadia Kheyl hamlet at the mouth of the Kohat Pass. In January last he effected the surprise of Gari Gul with the 14th Sikhs, and in 1869, as far as political man- agement was concerned, he arranged the surprise and capture of Gara Bazoti. The invariable success which has attended the repeated instances of surprise and attack of strongholds in the hill country by Captain Cavagnari, shows distinctly that when judgment is com- bined with courage, our troops are quite capable of beating the hill men in their own tactics and on their own ground. The object of Captain Cavagnari's attack upon Sapri was, if possible, to capture Mian Bukn, and the attacking party, consisting of 250 sabres of Guide Cavalry and eleven men of the Guide Infantry (mounted on mules), with Captain Battye, Oaptain Hutchinson, Lieutenant Hughes, Dr. Mal- linp, Captain Cavagnari, Ghulam Mohin din (tahaildar, Dandazi), and Atta Mahomed Khan, inspector of police, moved out from Mardan at seven o'clock on the evening of the 14th FebniMy. Avoiding the villages of Tangi and Abazii, to prevent the chance of news of the approach of the troops being conveyed across the border, they dismounted about two miles from the latter place, leaving their horses in charge of fifty men, who received orders to take the animals to Abazi Fort at daylight. Captain Cavagnari and the rest proceeded on foot to within a rifle-shot of Sapri, and attempted to make a reconnaissance of the position of the village —an effort which was frustrated by the barking of the village dogs upon hearing the approach. It was then about four o'eleck a.m., and the men who acted asguides stated that Mian Bukn would probably be found either in the village mosque or in his own tower. Captain Cavagnari gathered from the description given to him that the mosque was only a short distance from the pathway -they were going by, and that a sudden rush would enable them to seize it. The tewer was said to be in the centre of the village, and could be com- manded from the spur of the main range of hills which lie to the west of Sapri, on which they were waiting for day to break. Captain Battye arranged to place a picket of his men on this spur, and with the remainder to assault the village, and as it seemed hopeless to surround it with any certainty of success, he laid his plana so as to devote every- thing to the capturing of Mian Rukn. Day- light having broken (says the Deputy-Commissioner), the asokult on the mosque was made. The surprise of the village was complete in every sense, and the inmates of the mosque awoke to find soldiers with drawn swords standing over them. The rest of the villagers turned out with that alacrity common to the hill men, the moment they were alarmed, and re- treated to the hills behind the village, firing their matchlocks at the troops as the latter ascended the village. Having secured the mosque, Captain Battye and myself proceeded at once to the Mian's tower, but it was unoccupied, and for the time we feared that the inan had escaped; but we were shortly informed of the good news that he was amongst those who had taken refuge in a house behind the mosque. We re- turned there and called upon the people inside to surrender, threatening to burn the roof and force them to come out. I must mention here that the gallantry of a duffadar of the Guides, named Turabaz, was very conspicuous in the way he kept guard over this house, through the door of which occasional shots were fired by the inmates, wounding two of the soldiers, and he succeeded in firing his carbine into the hut, and killing a nephew of the Mian's. I told the tahsildar to call out to Rukn Mian that resistance on his part was hopeless, and that quarter would be given. He came out, and I seized him by the left hand to assure him that his death then and there was not desired. In fact, I imagined that he held out his hand with the object of obtaining such assurance. Re, however, made a couple of thrusts with a dagger, which he had in his right hand at the tahsildar, who was standing on my left. A pocket-book saved the first thrust from doing more than slightly cutting the tahsildar's stomach, and the second merely grazed his arm. The Mian was instantly cut down by the soldiers; the other men surrendered quietly, and were made prisoners. Our loss during the expedition was only six wounded, three being dangerous or severe wounds, and the remainder very trifling ones." The Viceroy has specially acknowledged the services of Captain Cavagnari and Captain Wigram Battye on the occasion of the recent successful attack upon Sapri.

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NATIVE RACES IN CHINà. í

A HERO OF THE COMMUNE.

THE BATTLE OF MONASTERO. f

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THE DEAF AND DUMn AT BOARD…

THE DREADFUL FAMINE IN CHINA.

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