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LONDON CORRESPONDENCE

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LONDON CORRESPONDENCE THOUGH the fear and the danger of war are not equal nov to what they were a few weeks ago, there is still some cause for the feeling of uneasiness which exists. The refusal of England to have any thing to do with the Congress unless the full text of the ratified treaty was submitted for discussion, and the objections taken by our Ambassador at Constantinople to the proposed embarkation of Russian troops at Buyukdere, serve to show how critical the situation continues to be. The imperfections of the treaty on many points Bhow how much remains for the European Congress to do before anything like a final aettlement of the long-vexed Eastern Question can be acoomplished.. Some surprise was felt at the length of time which the Russian and Turkish plenipotentiaries took in concocting the treaty but a careful perusal of the twenty- nine Articles of which it consists, makes it it manifest that its framers had imposed upon them a very difficult task. Indeed it may be questioned if ever any stataimen vere called uoon to exercise their brains in the framing of a trea'-y involving so many tick'.i&h points and conflicting interests. One of the best things in Parliament of late was the speech in which Earl Granville pourel contempt upon a motion brought forward by Lord Stratheden and Campbell, who is perpetually boring the House of Lords about matters con- nected with the Congress and the situation in the East, and who generally chooses the worst possible tima for making the observations in which he thinks fit to indulge. The refinement of the strain of irony that pervaded Lord Granville's brief but effective speech made it all the more incisive; and Lord Stratheden and Campbell must be remarkably impervious to the attacks of masterly ridicule if he did not wince under the sharp cuts he received. Perhaps if Lord Derby were endowed with a modicum of Lord Gran- ville's playful spirit, he would be troubled with fewer questions from the lips of his tormentors in the House of Lords. There is to be no review of volunteers on Easter Monday, though one of the reasons originally assigned for making that day a Bank Holiday was that the volunteer corps might be able. to attend their annual gathering^' It is a pity that it was found impossible to carry out the project, as there is a probability, from sundry iadioataons, that the gathering would have been a larger one than on any previous ocoasion. The sub-committee, whom the metropolitan volunteer commanding officers had appointed to make ar- rangements for holding a review on Easter Mon- day, met with a constant suooession of refusals and disappointments. The railway companies professed their inability to take any large number of troops to Brighton, Dover, Folke- stone, Margate, Portsmouth, or Aldershot in consequence of the superabundance of their Easter Monday traffic. Epsom Downs were then thought of, but again the railway companies had their nonpossumus; and the Grand Stand Association also declined to invite the volunteers. More ascommo- dating than other railway companies, the London and North-Western, the Great Northern, and the. Midland were prepared to renew the facilities previously afforded; but Lord Brownlow, in reply to an application, stated that circumstances pre- vented his inviting the volunteers to Tring this year; and the idea of Dunstable had also to be <#t aside, as it was found that the crops would be too far forward to adinit of manoeuvring without doing great damage. The fates therefore had clearly set their face against the metropolitan volunteer ooras having an outing this Eaater. It was recently resolved, at a publio meeting held at the Mansion Reuse, to promote the hold- ing of a great Agricultural Exhibition in London next year, under the auspices of the Royal Agricultural Society of England, and an influential committee was appointed to carry out the object. Since then a letter has appeared from the Lord Mayor stating that the committee have it in contemplation to take steps to eularge the scope of the Exhibition, and to give it an international character. The great difficulty at the outset appears to be the selection of a suitable site. At the Mansion House meeting it was considered desirable, if possible, to hold the Exhibition in Hyde-park; but the committee have already ascertained that it is impracticable to carry out this suggestion. In 1862, under the auspices of the same society, there was an International Agricultural Show held in Battersea-park but it was overshadowed by the Industrial Exhibition of the same year, and it turned out a failure. Battersea, besides, was more difficult of access thin it is now, and the tide of passenger traffia had then a decided tendency in the direction of Kensington. If a good site, easy of access, cannot be obtained, the project will require to h", abandoned. Remembering the failure of 1862 the committee may not care to think again about Battersea, though it can now be reached more readily than at that time. On what grounds the Duke of Cambridge and the First Commissioner of Works refused Hyde- park for the purpose has not been made public. So much, however, depends upon the choice of a proper site that this point should be settled first before subscriptions are solicited to defray the expense of the Exhibition, which is estimated, according to the Lord Mayor's statement, at not leMthanjB30,000. The Benchers have been censored, and very properly too, for sanctioning the removal from the Temple Gardens of the very venerable his- toric tree, which was supposed to have been the trysting place of Henry VIII. and Anne Bo!eyn. It has been suggested, moreover, that, as Shakes- peare in 14 Henry VI.* puts the scene as to origin of the quarrel between the Red Rose and the White in the Temple Gardens, it was probably near or under the shade of the destroyed tree thai Plantagenet plucked a white and Somerset a red rose. The tree was doomed to make room for what has been appropriately called u the vulgar continuation of Plowden-buildings," whioh form another encroaohment on gardens that ought to be preserved intact. Owing to the sensational character of the account of the affair which appeared in the Pall- mall Gazette, there has been a good deal of speculation about the deaths of Felicitas Squibbs and her companion Ellen Maddox-two young women who were found drowned in the River Lea, near Ware, which is a little market town twenty-one miles distant from London. The coroner is blamed for declining to allow any adjournment of the inquest, as if he wished to prevent an investigation which might have the effect of compromising some person of position in the neighbourhood who is said to have corresponded with one of the girls. The facts, however, that the bodies bore no marks of vio- lence, and that the Lea, owing to its depth and stillness, is a fatal river, reader it highly probable that the unfortuaate young women were acci- dentally drowned. A brother of Felioitas Squibbs, writing to the Times from Lower Norwood, has strongly condemned the conduct of the ooroner, and bast urged that if the metropolitan, instead of the IoMl, police were to take the matter in hand, the result of their labours migh r. bring about some startling revelations. Mr. Leopold Squibb?, if any suspicious circumstances have come under his knowledge, would have aot-d more widely and prudently if, instead of writing a letter on the subject, he had communicated privately with the local police or the metropo- litan detectives. j) q

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--TEXT OF THE PEACE TREATY.

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FOUNDERING OF; 1^2" II&ferY…

MARRIAGE IN HIGH LIFE.

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