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RED-COATED VOLUNTEERS. j

THE FUTURE RELATIONS OF RUSSIA…

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THE SUBMISSION OF THE JOWAKIS.…

REMARKABLE CASE. : " t

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THE CATTLE BILL.

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THE CATTLE BILL. (From the "held,) From a consumer's point of view it is to be desired that traffic in dead meat should supersede traffic in live animals. And that this result has already ob- tained to a great extent, the figures quoted by the Duke of Richmond go far to prove. Oonnning his facts to the Scotch trade, the noble lord showed that, in the five years from 1873 to 1877 inclusive, 31,651 tons of dead meat and 25,591 live animals had been conveyed to London by the Caledonian Railway Com- pany and by the Aberdeen Steam Navigation Company; or, estimating the average weight of each carcase at 61 cwt., that during that period, by those routes and modes of conveyance, 99,388 animals had been carried in the form of dead meat, as against 26,591 carried alive. Moreover, the cost of so bring- ing dead meat from Aberdeen to London was practically so small (amounting only to something like a halfpenny per pound), as to make no appreciable difference in the price. The importa- tion of store and dairy cattle and of cattle for breed- ing purposes stands, of course, on a very different footing from that of the importation of cattle in- tended for immediate conversion into food. It can never be intended to put a complete stopto this branch of the trade. Some provision, therefore, will have to be made in order to secure immunity from in- fection from animals introduced into this country for breeding and other purposes inconsistent with their slaughter at the port of landing. The Select Com- mittee upon the Cattle Plague and Importation of Live Stock, after recommending the prohibition of the importation of all animals from certain countries, advised that an exception should be made "in favour of store and dairy animals, provided they remain in quarantine for fourteen days, and afterwards are placed under inspection for two months." We all admit that free trade in cattle, just as free trhde in all other commodities, would, com- mercially speaking, be best for producers and con- sumers alike. It is only because necessity obliges us to impose restrictions that we assent to them. And we do so the more willingly, because we feel assured of their ultimate success in stamping out disease—not, indeed, disease in foreign countries, unless other nations adopt similar precautions, but disease amongst our own herds, when the necessity for restrictions upon the movement of cattle from place to place will no longer exist, and the trade within our own borders will be freer than ever. In short, to secure freedom ultimately, we are content to endure restraint for a while. — y

THE PARIS EXHIBITION.

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A SINGULAR ROBBERY. ;--;

DEATH OF THE OLD HIPPOPOTAMUS.I

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! PROPOSED AGRICIJLTTJR^L…

THE WRECK OF THE MAIL STEAMER…

VICTOR HUGO AND PRINCE NAPOLEON.I

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AMUSING THEATRICAL CASJI.

LUIGI PATOCCHI.

LETTER FASTENINGS. ,

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