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RED-COATED VOLUNTEERS. j

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RED-COATED VOLUNTEERS. j The adoption of a more uniform style of dress i a moag our volunteers of different corps is a matter (says the Daily News) on which they are to be con- J gratulated. The grand costumes and feathered i Helmets in which many of the early corps accoutred t u^mselves disappeared as soon as the volun- taers began to settle down to work, but t hey have never yet been able to fix upon one u jlour for their tunics and jackets. As far as volunteer artillery and engineers are concerned to ere has not been the same difficulty, for in this ,so the colour and pattern adopted in the regular as my have served for the guidance of these branches of the reserves. But the infantry, or volunteer rifles, • i %re from the commencement had various views upon the subject of the colour of their dress. Grey was H iopted by many as the most serviceable and least fikely to be spoilt by rough usage, aa also because the colour was not easily distinguishable against the nky line; others chose dark-green uniforms be- cau le dark green was the colour of the regular r\A regiments; while a third party, small i t first, but growing daily larger, clothed themselves 1 i red because it is the national colour, and the true stume of the British soldier. In a very few years it seema we may expect that the scarlet of the line and militia will be the universal colour also of the volunteers, for whereas at the beginning of volunteer- ing red coats were few and far between, while grey and green were the popular colours, the reverse is at the present moment the case. It was but the other day that two more battalions of the cele- brated Grey Brigade" announced their resolve to adopt a scarlet uniform; and, according to a statement just made by the Secretary of State for War, grey and green are now vastly in the minority. Mr. Hardy has told us that there are ninety-one regiments uniformed in searlet, sixty-six in green, and flfty-seven in grey. Only these three colours are recognised by the War Office, and volun- teer infantry cannot purchase cloth of any other shade from the Royal Army Clothing Factory at Pimlico. Mr. Hardy hopes that we may speedily see but one colour adopted by the volunteer service, and certainly if our citizen infantry are ever to stand in line of battle with regulars and militia, there cannot be a doubt as to the advisability of having them simi- larly clothed. Otherwise we may be quite sure that an enemy would not fail to throw his full weight upon that point of the line where the colours of the uni- t arms indicated that it was weakest.

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