Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

14 articles on this Page

LONDON CORRESPONDENCE.

[No title]

FOREIGN AND COLONIAL.

jTHE SOUTH AFRICAN ABORIGINES.

News
Cite
Share

j THE SOUTH AFRICAN ABORIGINES. Sir Bartle Prere, Governor of the Oape Oolony, has j addressed a despatch, dated King William's Town, January 9th, to the Earl of Oarnarvon with reference to a letter from the Aborigines Protection Society to the Secretary of State for the Colonies. There can be no doubt, Sir Bartle Frere says, that the Galekas en- deavoured to impress the colonial authorities with the idea that their quarrel was solely with the Fingoes, but it seems clear that this was not the view of the Galtika leaders, and that had they got the better of the Fingoes, they would have pressed their ad- vantage to overcome some other symbol of European progress and of the growth of European ideas, and to bring back the good old days of unrestrained Kaffirdom. The Galekas commenced the war with the observance of some of the usages of civilised warfare, but it is a fact which should not be forgotten that the two first and most desperate attacks upon the police, all Euro- peans, at Gwandana and Ibeka were entirely unpro- voked by any invasion or threat of invasion of Kreli's territory. The attacks were made on a standing camp within what every Galeka knew was the boundary line of the territory formally annexed to the colony. The society has been misinformed, Sir Bartle Frere considers, as to the absence of any long premeditated design to take up arms." He has little doubt that for two or three years past there has been among the rising generation of uncivilised Kaffir tribes a growing impatience and jealousy of the influence acquired by inferior tribes which have accepted some measure of civilisation and the prosperity which has accompanied it. He has not given any countenance to the proposal to confiscate all the Galeka lands, and he has every reason to believe that the present operations have been conducted more in accordance with the usages of civilised warfare in other countries than was apparently the case in former Kaffir wars. The society has been misinformed as to the Galekas not having offered any real resistance to forces in the field." Sir Bartle Frere concludes I believe that every one of the societies which de- votes itself to the improvement of the natives races has an influence more or less efficient in furthering the social and political advancement of the Kaffir races • Dut none have greater influence than those which pro- mote industrial as well as religious education, and nothing can I believe do more to prevent future Kaffir wars than a multiplication of institutions like Love- dale and Blythewood, and an extension of their system of industrial education to agriculture."

[No title]

SUPPRESSION OF THE SLAYE TRADE…

[No title]

WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

[No title]

THE EASTERN QUESTION.

ANOTHER COLLIERY EXPLOSION.

[No title]

PARLIAMENTARY INTELUGENCE.

[No title]