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THE LAKE COUNTRY FISHERIES.…

VISIT OF LORDS OF THE ADMIRALTY…

THE REPORTED DISCOVERY OF…

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THE MILITARY FORCE OF ENGLAND

FAILURE OF AN EX-M.P.

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THE TURKISH FLEET. \

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THE NEW EDUCATION CODE. ;

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OUR EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.

ARMED ATTACK UPON SOCIALISTS…

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LORD NAPIER AND SIR GARNET…

THE TELEPHONE AND THE EXISTING…

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THE TELEPHONE AND THE EXISTING TELEGRAPH. The Postmaster-General has already announced that this new invention will not be adopted in our postal telegraph service. It is not a little remarkable, however, that almost the first practical observations which have been made from official sources on the telephone are to be found in a recent number of the Telegraph Bulletin of the Ottoman Administration, of which the following translation appears in the current number of Chambers' Journal: Is the telephone— yes or no-destined to replace other telegraph instruments ? and, seeing the possibility that people may use it without special training, is it in the end destined to destroy the career of telegraph employ £ s ? These questions merit from us the labour of being examined with care. We think that that instrument will never be able to be employed in tele- graphic working destined to serve Governments and the public. In effect, supposing the instrument perfect, arrived at the last limits of perfection, and able to work at all distances with or without relays, then— !• To J transmit a message with all the advantages offered by the system, it would be necessary that the sender should be able to speak himself directly with the receiver, without the intervention of an emjtloyi. Now, all those who know the organization of the lines know that this is not possible — that there must necessarily be intermediary offices of deposit, that the public cannot be admitted to the offices where messages are transmitted or received, and, consequently, the sender must give hie message written. 2. An employt once charged with the biessage the instrument has already lost one of its principal advantages, for that employS must read the message and pronounce it to his correspondent; but if the message is written in a foreign language, the impracticability is evident. Lastly, the telegraph administrations now possess instruments which permit them to send messages with much greater speed than can ,be obtained in sending them by the voice. Those reasons alone, and there are many others, ought, then, to assure the employes that this new instrument will not put in peril their means of existence."

EXTRAORDINARY CASE OF SWINDLING.

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EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE'OF LEVYING…

CAUSES OF THE AFRICAN OUTBREAK

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GALLIPOLI AND ITS HISTORY.…