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THE LAKE COUNTRY FISHERIES.…

VISIT OF LORDS OF THE ADMIRALTY…

THE REPORTED DISCOVERY OF…

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THE MILITARY FORCE OF ENGLAND

FAILURE OF AN EX-M.P.

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THE TURKISH FLEET. \

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THE NEW EDUCATION CODE. ;

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OUR EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.

ARMED ATTACK UPON SOCIALISTS…

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LORD NAPIER AND SIR GARNET…

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LORD NAPIER AND SIR GARNET WOLSELEY. It has been announced, as stated elsewhere, that Lord Napier of Magdala and Sir Garnet Wolseley are to h i-ve chief command of any expeditionary force that may be sent out in case of war. Tho Standard savs In Lord Napier we have calm, matured judgment, wide experience, and great military knowledge; while his chief of the staff has also great military experience, with an abundance of activity, energy, and knowledge of detail. Lord Napier is advanced in life, as he was born in 1810, but he is still as active as most men many years his junior. An example of his determi- nation and personal energy was shown during the visit of the Prince of Wales to India. The day before the arrival of his. Royal Highness at Delhi Lord Napier was thrown from his horse and broke his collar-bone. Notwithstanding this mishap, he received the Prince at the railway station, and bore his part throughout the four days of fatiguing work which followed. Lord Napier entered the Bengal Engineers in 1828, and saw his first active service in the Sutlej campaign. He was senior Engineer at the siege of Mooltan, and took part in the battle of Goojorat. During the Indian mutiny he occupied the positiou as chief of the Engineer Department with the army of Sir Colin Campbell. After no long pause he was again called upon for service in the field, and greatly distinguished himself as second in com- mand in the Chinese war. In the intervals of active service he fulfilled the arduous duties of the engiieer- ing service in India, and was occupied in the construc- tion of roads, bridges, barracks, and public works of all kinds. In 1865 he was appointed to the command of the Bombay army, and two years later started at the head of the expeditionary army to Abyssinia. In 1870 he was appointed Oommander-in-Ohief in India, and at the expiration of his term of service received the command at Gibraltar. Thus Lord Napier has seen an immense amount of service in the field, and has held great military commands. As an engineer his reputa- tion stands very high. There were many comments made at his appointment to the command of an army in the field, as it was the first time, at least for a very long time, that that honour had been bestowed upon an officer of Engineers. How well he justified the selection IS a matter of history, and there can be no doubt that in modern warfare, in which sieges and earthworks play a prominent part, the possession of a thorough knowledge of engineering by a general com- manding is a matter of great utility. Sir Garnet Wolseley first saw service in the Burmese war, in 1852, the year in which he entered the army. He exchanged from the 80th into the 90th Foot, and with the latter regiment took part in the Crimean war. He was present with Lord Napier at the siege of Lucknow, as well as in the campaign in China. In 1867 he was appointed Quartermaster-General in Canada, and he had the good fortune to command the Red River expedition, which was completely suc- cessful and in consequence of the skill and power of organisation which be displayed he was chosen for the command of the Ashantee expedition. That Sir Garnet Wolseley has been an exceptionally fortunate officer he would himself be the first to admit, but he has thoroughly deserved his success. He is an able organiser and an indefatigable worker. He possesses a thorough knowledge of detail, and can'be relied on to carry out the arrangements of his chief. Sir Garnet Wolseley has the power of attracting the most zealous friendship and service from those brought into close contact with him. Lord Napier is, it need hardly be said, although a strict disciplinarian, one of the most popular men in the service. The combination I of these able generals is an excellent one, and will com- mand general approval.

THE TELEPHONE AND THE EXISTING…

EXTRAORDINARY CASE OF SWINDLING.

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EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE'OF LEVYING…

CAUSES OF THE AFRICAN OUTBREAK

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GALLIPOLI AND ITS HISTORY.…