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THE LAKE COUNTRY FISHERIES.…

VISIT OF LORDS OF THE ADMIRALTY…

THE REPORTED DISCOVERY OF…

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THE MILITARY FORCE OF ENGLAND

FAILURE OF AN EX-M.P.

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THE TURKISH FLEET. \

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EXTRAORDINARY GOOSE EGGS.—About the year 1867, when I was an assistant-collector in the Tinneyelly district of Southern India, I was living with a friend who had two geese, or rather a goose and a gander. The goose had never laid an egg, and as she had long since reached maturity, my friend naturally supposed that the delay was due to some constitutional defect. At last, however, his patience was rewarded, but not exactly in the way that one would have expected. The goose did indeed lay, but what it laid was not an egg in the ordinary sense, but a something in the form of a goose, and only resembling an egg in having a white shell. The resemblance to the form of a goose consisted in there being a body, if I may so call it, of the usual shape, with a neck proportionately long, and terminating in something resembling a head and beak. The egg was not materially injured, which was much to be wondered at considering its shape, but at the point where the body of a goose usually terminates in a tail there was a certain softness and semi-transparency. This appearance was also notice- able about the places where the eyes would be, and where the head terminated, as I have said, in a sort of beak; and at the extremity of the latter part, a little of the albumen found means of escape. The shell was perfectly smooth at the place where the legs, had there been any, should have appeared. The neck was not in a line with the body, but curved upwards from the breast in the usual way. Soon after this the same goose presented my friend with another extraordinary egg, but not in so interest- ing a form as the one I have just described. It was, moreover, in an imperfect state when I saw it. Its appearance was that of a tube of irregular form, about two inches long, and varying from a quarter to a third of an inch thick. It was covered with a shell resembling that of an egg, and when I saw it the albumen was escaping at both ends. After producing these phenomena, the goose for some time suspended operations, but suddenly took to laying again, and then in the normal way.—Live Stock Journal. A DRUNKEN GROOM.—Henry War,d groom to a gentleman residing in Hyde-park-square, was charged, in a London police-court, with being drunk and cruelly treating a horse. Police-constable Stanley, A 262, said he saw the defendant riding after a lady in Hyde-park and beating his horse over the head with a hunting-whip and spurring it on both sides. The prisoner pulled the horse on the kerb and it fell. The prisoner was drunk. There were weals on the horse's shoulder, and blood was issuing from the spur wounds. Being told he would be taken into custody the pri- soner threatened to hit the constable over the head with his whip. The defendant hit the horse at least a dozen times, and was not missed by the lady on whom he was attending. The prisoner's defence was that he was sorry and such a thing should not occur again. Mr. Newton said it was a question whether the de- fendant should have the option of paying a Bag Dumb animals were not to be treated in such a bar- barous manner. The defendant would have to pay a fine of 50s. NOVEL USE OF THE TELEGRAPH.-A novel use of the telegraph has- lately been adopted by the Norwegian Government. As is well known, the her- ring fishery forms one of the most important sources of income for the country, the captures being made as the great shoals come from the depths of the sea to deposit their spawn in the Norwegian fiords. It frequently happens that the object of their visit is ac- complished and they return to the ocean before news of their arrival reaches the fishers on distant parts of the coast. This difficulty is now obviated by the con- struction of a telegraphic line 200 kilometres in length, composed chiefly of submarine cables, by means of which the fishers along the whole coast are enabled to gather at once on the approach of a shoal to any particular fiord. The abundant captures made in this way show the investment in telegraphic wire to have been a most profitable speculation. Na- t,tre..

THE NEW EDUCATION CODE. ;

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OUR EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.

ARMED ATTACK UPON SOCIALISTS…

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LORD NAPIER AND SIR GARNET…

THE TELEPHONE AND THE EXISTING…

EXTRAORDINARY CASE OF SWINDLING.

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EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE'OF LEVYING…

CAUSES OF THE AFRICAN OUTBREAK

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GALLIPOLI AND ITS HISTORY.…