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THE LAKE COUNTRY FISHERIES.…

VISIT OF LORDS OF THE ADMIRALTY…

THE REPORTED DISCOVERY OF…

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THE MILITARY FORCE OF ENGLAND

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THE MILITARY FORCE OF ENGLAND Sir Garnet Wolseley contributes an article to the March number of the Nineteenth Century. We give his concluding observations: "At no previous period of our history have we ever been so strong, in H, mili- tarv sense, as at present. In 1854 we were very weak in field artillery; the military force in these islanda was under 70,000 men, and th«rn was no reserve whatever beyond some pensioners, who were too old for field service. Were war declared to-morrow, about 400,000 drilled men would fall into line if required, supported by 372 field guns, manned and horsed by the Royal Artillery. That number would j roughlv be made up as follows: Standing army at Jieme, 99,000 men army and militia rfesrve, 40,000 j men militia, 85,000 men volunteers, 180,000 men second-class army reserve, 10,000 men total, <414,000 men. In this calculation I have put the figures very low,R.r.d have left out altogether the 10,000 yeomanry who would be available for home service, f. have, likewise, not taken into consideration the number of regular troops that would be available for war j when the Mediterranean garrisons were furnished by the militia. It will thus be seen that we could, at oaoa take the field with two fully-equipped army j corp3 of more than 30,000 soldiers each, leaving a similar force of regular troops at home as a reserve. When I compare the military strength of England now with what it was in 1854,1 am as amazed at the conditions of military weakness and helplessness in which we were when we began the Russian war of that year, as I am at the ignorance of those who are now to be heard croaking over our supposed want of strength, and our alleged consequent inability to fight. Unlike most other na- tions, if we declare war we need have no appre- hension qf invasion; this confers upon us the great advantage of being able to choose our own time for beginning active hostilities, and as our army would necessarily have to be conveyed by sea to the theatre of war, we are always able to select the line of opera- tions considered best and most suitable to the force we act with. In fact, the initiative would rest with us, and I need not tell the student of history how in- yaluable it is to the commander who knows how to take advantage of it. But if we are to secure this national advantage of the initiative, we must act with unity ef purpose."

FAILURE OF AN EX-M.P.

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THE TURKISH FLEET. \

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THE NEW EDUCATION CODE. ;

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OUR EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.

ARMED ATTACK UPON SOCIALISTS…

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LORD NAPIER AND SIR GARNET…

THE TELEPHONE AND THE EXISTING…

EXTRAORDINARY CASE OF SWINDLING.

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EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE'OF LEVYING…

CAUSES OF THE AFRICAN OUTBREAK

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GALLIPOLI AND ITS HISTORY.…