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THE LAKE COUNTRY FISHERIES.…

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THE LAKE COUNTRY FISHERIES. Encouraged by the recent Act of Parliament, which now protects the rivers and broads of Norfolk and Suffolk, the authorities of the lake districts of Cum- berland and Westmoreland have lately made a move in a similar direction. In consequence of a deputa- tion to the Home Secretary, headed by Mr. J. Fell, chairman of the Kent, Duddon, &e., Salmon Fishery District, the inspectors of salmon fisheries, Messrs. Buckland and Walpole, during the past week have held courts of inquiry into a possibility of protect- ing the fish which are natives of these magnificent lakes. The fish in question are trout, charr, perch, pike, eels, &c.; no carp. roach, or tench as the climate of this mountainous region 33 probably too cold for them. Mr. Jackson, secre- tary or the Kent Salmon Board, gav? evidence that the result of his calculations showed that tbe lake district, in a fishery sense, may be said to contain DO less than thirty-five thousand four hundred and twenty acres of water, which should be producing a certain quantity of food, and incidentally a large amount of sport to the numerous visitor8 who came into the district tv^ry season. Until the passing- of the last Salmon Act, 1873 (which enacts that ebarr and trout, in a salmon fishery district. shouH be pro- tected in the spawning time), in the memory of man no organised protection or regulation of these great inland fish-producing waters has ever been carried out. At the inquiry at Keswick, Lord Lonsdale and Lord Leconfleld were represented by their agents, Mr. Little and Mr. Olutton, and a discussion took place as to the desirability of forming local Boards of Oonser vators to arrange the details of the tresh-water lake fisheries. The river Derwent, running out of the two large lakes Bassenthwaite and Cruaimock, and emptying itself into the sea at Workington, is na- tnrally a productive salmon river. The small rivers the Bden and Irt are also frequented by salmon, and towards the back-end of the year by sea trout. The interest of Lord Muncaster, of Ravenglass, and the rivers in this part of the country, were ably repre- sented at the inquiry by Mr. Stanley, of Pousonby Hall, and Mr. Jonas Lindow, of Irton Hall, high sheriff of Cumberland. It is hoped that the result of this inquiry will afford protection te the indigenous fish of the Cumberland and Westmoreland lakes, and that a salmon fishery district will be formed so as to in- clude the. whole of the Cumberland coast from the northernmost limit of the Kent district in the south to the southernmost limit of the Eden on the north. Those who are accustomed to visit the lake district in the tourist season should take interest in this move- ment to cultivate the fish cf Cumberland and West- moreland, inasmuch as when fish are plentiful a new source of amusement will be opened up to them, en- hancing the already pleasant tourist trips afforded by fresh air and beautiful scenery. Londoners also are directly interested in this movement. Potted charr are getting scarce; and, if the fish are not protected, this delicacy will eventually disappear from our breakfast and luncheon tables.

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