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THE AMERICAN SILVER BILL.

A COURT TORCH-LIGHT DANCE.

OUR MILITARi RESOURCES Itf-IWDIA*/

OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE.

.,"A FIGHT AT ODESSA.

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n ITHE LAW AFFECTING INSANE…

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, DEAN STANLEY ON THE POPES…

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A ROMANCE m JteEAh LIFE.

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A COSTLY SOLDIER.

HUSBAND AND WIFE.

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HUSBAND AND WIFE. At the Olerkenwell Police-court, Joseph Watkins, cabinetmaker, 358, Liverpool-road, was charged on remand with assaulting his wife, Bsther. Mr. Bicketts, solicitor, defended. The complainant stated that on Monday night her husband came home and asked for a clean shirt, and, on being told that it had gone to the wash and had not been returned, he be- came violent, knocked her down by a blow in the face, and bruised her severely. In reply to Mr. Bicketts the witness said she had always been a good wife to the prisoner. Mr. Bicketts handed witness a letter addressed to her, and asked the namfe of the writer, which she refused to give. Mr. Bicketts then read the letter as follows: < My darling Esther,—I sit down to write you a few more lines before I leave you for good, but before I do that I wish to ask yod one or two ques- tions. The first one is this: If I get money, will you oome away with me somewhere, say either in England or to France ? only do not say so now, add then, when we are going to start, alter your Mind. I dare say I shall manage' tv. get by to-morrow .£16 to £ 20. Now, my darling, will you come With me? The people who I shall get the money from will nottronble to come after me, so now, if yon love me, you will oome, Ac." This letter, with some poetry, written in the same handwriting, the prisoner had found hi a box belong- ing to his wife. The poetry was supposed to re- present the feelings of two separated hearts, and was asfollows: A heart I here prssent to you, A heart that is sincere and true; » That never will incline to join To any other heart but thine. Two hearts you have, and I have none, Now is it not a wonder That you should have your heart and mine, And be so far asunder ? (Much laughter.) The writer (continued Mr. Bieketts) then described his feelings as follows: I feel so extremely revengeful to-day, So teeming with purposeless spite, That everyone—except you—that comes in my way, I have such a longing to bite. Ifeel so unmeaningly vicious and raw, With all my relations and friends, My heart is so bent upon going to law, To give me an untimely end. With yearning so nearly akin to distress I feel that I inwardly long To go to your bad, wicked husband, And do him some horrible wrong! Mr. Bicketts contended that his client, eould he give evidence, would be able to show that he had been shamefully treated. The discovery of such letters by him naturally created a feeling of animosity against his wife, who refused to give him the name of the writer. During Mr. Bieketts's remarks, the com- Slainant was most violent in her accusations against her husband. Mr. Hosack ordered the prisoner to enter into his own surety in the sum of .£10, to be of good behaviour for six months. "\1." 4

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ENGLAND'S FIELD ARMY..

A PLEA FOR "BREACH OF PROMISE."

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