Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

LONDON CORRESPONDENCE.

[No title]

SOMETHING LIKE A FOSSIL.

THE EXPERIENCE OF A TICKET-OF-LEAYE…

MILITARY DIVORCE CASE.

News
Cite
Share

MILITARY DIVORCE CASE. The case of Currie v. Currie and Thewles, in which both the petitioner and co-respondent are officers in the army, was heard before the President of the Divorce Court without a jury. Mr. F. A. Inder- wick, Q.C., Dr. Tristram, and Mr. Callaghan ap- peared for the petitioner; and Mr. W. B. Griffiths for the respondent. The co-respondent was not re- presented by counsel. The petitioner is a captain in the 41st Foot, and the respondent, at the time of the marriage, was the daughter of a solicitor at Brecon. The petitioner and respondent were married there in the year 1873, and cohabited together at various places on terms of perfect happi- ness till 1875, when they went to reside at a cottage called The Glen," near Farnborough, in the neigh- bourhood of the Staff College at Sandhurst, where Captain Ourrie was engaged in his professional duties. The co-respendent, who is a captain in the 69th Foot, was intimately acquainted, with Captain Ourrie before his marriage, and continued on the same terms afterwards, visiting him at Farnborough and other places. In July, 1876, Captain Currie was suddenly called abroad by the death of his father, and on the night of his depar- ture there was a ball at the Staff College, to which several of his wife's guests, among others the co- respondent, went, she herself remaining at home. The petitioner had telegraphed to the co-respondent not to come as he himself was compelled to leave, but the telegram miscarried. Captain Thewles returned from the ball early, and passed the remainder of the evening alone with the respondent in the drawing- room. In February, 1877, while the petitioner and re- spondent were travelling through Wales, the latter became unwell, and, at her husband's suggestion, came up to London to consult Sir William Jenner. She went to stay at Woolwich with her husband's sister, who had married Captain Bengough, and early in March she was confined of a child, of whom she admitted to her husband that Captain Thewlea was the father. The petitioner wrote to the co- respondent to know if it were true, and he, then re- siding at Bugby, wrote by the same post, the let- ters crossing, confessing the fact, apologising, and offering all reparation in his power, promising, among other things, to marry the lady when possible. Wit nesses were called to corroborate these confessions, who gave evidence of having repeatedly seen the re spondent and co-respondent together under sufficiently suggestive circumstances, whereupon the President pronounced a decree nisi, with costs against the co- respondent.

THE GREAT FIRE AT BRUGES.

[No title]

ATTEMPT TO SjdOOT fHEfMASTER…

Advertising

1-,..... WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

THE KAFFIR WAR.,;; --,ARBIVAL…

THE NEW POPE. .

[No title]

THE EASTERN QUESTION. |I

[No title]

'''"JS PARLIAMENTARY INTELLIGENCE.

A MODERN MIRACLE. I

[No title]