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TURKISH SOLDIERS.

THE NEW BRITISH IRONCLADS.

[No title]

TORPEDOES.

BREACH OF PROMISE.

EXECUTION AT WINCHESTER.

NAVAL PREPARATIONS.

ITHE DEFENCES OF 1SHE THAMES.

[No title]

THE BRADLAUGH-BESANT APPEAL.

A NEW ANIMAL.

[No title]

DOG LICENSES.

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DOG LICENSES. In their 20th report just issued, for the year ending March 30,1877, the Commissioners of Inland Revenue date that in the year ended December 31, 1876, duty was paid upon 1,362,176 dogs, showing an increase of £16,000 over the preceding year, and, going back for aye years, an increase of £ 56,263. As there is no reason (the Commissioners say) to suppose that the number of dogs has increased, "these figures indicate, at all events, some progress towards the full enforcement of the tax which we so much desire." The Commissioners add that, "without largely adding to the number of our officers, we cannot spare any of them from the more im- portant work of charging spirit and malt duties and surveying excise traders generally in order to patrol the streets and villages in search of dogs" They recommend that the efforts of the revenue officers should be supplemented by the police, who have more knowledge of individuals in their separate localities and more opportunities of making detec- tions of this kind, and if the police had statutory power to summon defaulters independently of their officers, great good could be effected. The Commis- sioners report decidedly against the plan so fre- quently proposed that all dogs should be compelled to wear an official collar as evidence that the licence duty has been paid, or that such evidence should be furnished by an official label attached to the collar. It is clear (says the Commissioners) "that the collar, either with or without the label, must be irremovable, in order that neither might he transferred at will. It may be left to the dullest imagination to fcuggest the consequences of soldering an official collar on all dogs on the 1st of January in each year, or fastening a label thereto with a revenue lock-the regulations necessary for open- ing the collars under certain contingencies by an officer of Excise or, perhaps, in the presence of a magistrate, the penalties to be exacted for unauthor- ised opening of the collar, and other absurdities too many to enumerate. Then, again, the collar or label to be issued by our officers must be made with such nicety as to prevent forgery or imitation, and at the same time must be of such marked peculiarity that it could be recognised in passing as provided by this departaient. The cost of such collars would be con- siderable and would form an important addition to the tax, without any benefit to the revenue; but, sup- posing all these objections to be overcome, and that whenever a license is issued a collar should be fixed on the dog, what should we gain ? Should we not rather ask, "What should we not lose ? If A. takes a license and a collar and sells his dog to D., who sells it to 0., who givee it to D., we should get one license duty instead of four—that is, if we rely upon the collar as evidence of payment of duty, which by the proposition it is to be. If, after all, we are to go to our licence registers, we may save our- selves tne ridicule and the public the annoyance which the revenue collar would entail."

THE ORSINI BOMB OUTRAGE AT…

GROSS INHUMANITY IN A WORKHOUSE.".

A SHIP BURNT AT SEA.

THE SANDY POINT MUTINEERS.

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EXPLOSIONS IN MINES.

THE PHONOGRAPH.

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