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TURKISH SOLDIERS.

THE NEW BRITISH IRONCLADS.

[No title]

TORPEDOES.

BREACH OF PROMISE.

EXECUTION AT WINCHESTER.

NAVAL PREPARATIONS.

ITHE DEFENCES OF 1SHE THAMES.

[No title]

THE BRADLAUGH-BESANT APPEAL.

A NEW ANIMAL.

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THE RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF REVENUE from the 1st April, 1877, when there was a balance of £ 5,988,650, to Feb. 9 were £65,933,234, against £ 65,634,552 in the corresponding period of the pre- ceding financial year, which began with a balance of £ 5,119,587. The net expenditure was .£67t879,604, against X67,034,861 to the same date in the previou9 year. The Treasury balances on Feb. 9 amounted to £ 2,613,858, and at the same date in 1876 to £ 2,834,450. STRUCK OFF THB ROLLS.—The Master of the Rells delivered judgment on the conditional order to strike off the rolls Mr. Verdon, solicitor, of Gardiner- street, Dublin and formerly of Drogheda. The court was crowded. The master, in delivering ■aid on the 29th of last November, after the of the case of Bassett v. Kelly, he had felt makan order, calling on Mr. Verdon, a solicitor °' that court, to show cause why his name should not be struck off the rolls, having regard to his conduct in entering into a fraudulent and corrupt agreement with a person named Nugent, In consideration of his inducing Shuman, who had filed a bill against Kelly and Mr. Verdon to withdraw the said bill in which grave charges were brought against the defendants.be case of Bassett v. Kelly arose out of the dispealtion of the estate of the late Alderman Carty of Drog- heda. Mrs. Shuman, the wife of an old sailor. declared entitled to a considerable sum as one of t*10 next of kin; she had employed Mr. Verdon as her solicitor, and subsequently dying, left large bequests to him and his children. Her will was subsequ?utly impeached by her husband, and Bassett, the plain^ in the suit, was a clerk of Verdon's, who to recover a legacy left him by Mrs. Shuman. On this trial were made the revelations Mr. Verdon. His Honour said he had made the order, but upon the same sense of duty which com- pelled the Lord Chief Justice in the ease of Wbately and Bristoe to make an order exactly similar. 3Lr. Verdon had the advantage of being examined as witness in the case. He had failed then or lince to give any adequate explanation of his conduct, and » was therefore his imperative duty to strike him oS the rolls of solicitors of the court, as being a gentle- man who had forfeited his right to belong to his honourable profession. He made the order under a sense, not merely of what was due to the Court itself, but above all in justice to that profession of solicitors, which as a body were men of the highest honour and who ought to be spared the ,.igjion with » man who appeared to have made himself » party to such flagrant proceedings. Mr. counsel asked that a stay should be put upon the en- forcement of the order to give him time to app?* but his Honour refused the application as being with I °i*t precedent. I EXECUTION AT LIVERPOOL,—Junes Triokett t was executed at Kirkdale Gaol, Liverpool. for the » murder of his wife at Liverpool on the 26th of Dooem- ) her. The woman was an habitual drunkard, and on that evening he quarrelled with her and kicked her, I inflicting fatal injuries. The jury strongly reeom- > mended him to mercy, and it was thought hilllfe would be spared, but on Saturdaythe Home Secretary intimated that he could not interfere. The culprit appeared quite resigned, and was calm and very atten- tive to the ministrations of the Boman Catholic chaplain. Marwood was the executioner, and gave a drop of eight feet, death being instantaneous. Truth says in order to understand the Rossis^18» it is necessary to know them. The ordinary gentleman is amiable, and, as a companion, agreeable, He will even go out of his way to do a service but his peculiarity is, that he is utterly devoid of the eelf-reapect which characterises the gentlemen of other countries. Honour is a word that he has picked up but he never distinctly comprehends what it means. To blame him for this, would be as cruel aa to blame a blind man for not being able to distinguish colours- Personally, I rather like Bussians, but I should never dream of trusting one of them. A MTTM-CAiHMM employed II a IOrter at the General Post Office, named Mead, pleaded guilty. at the Central Criminal Court to a charge of stealing bank notes from letters, and was sentenced to eeven yeara* penal servitude. A clerk named OoraD, for receiving the notes knowing them to have been stolen, Was sentenced to five years' penal servitude. MADAMB RACHEL AoAm-Rubel Leverson, otherwise Madame Bachel, appeared at the Mwrl- borough-street Police-court, London, in answer to a summons charging her with having obtained by faløe and fraudulent representations jewellery to the value of X200 from Mra. Oectlla Maria Pearce, of Ebury- atreet. In the course of the evidence of the prosecu- trix, which was given at considerable length, she stated that for the sum mentioned she was to be made to resemble a countess who had undergone the process of enamelling at a cost of 2000 guineas. When the prosecutrix told Madame Rachel she would have to pledge her jewels, the latter stated that she had SS" worth of jewellery in her house already, which be- longed to ladies. An adjournment of the hearing took place, bail being accepted. A CLERGYMAN who had been aocosed of i preaching long sermons, excused himself on the ground that the church was a large one.

DOG LICENSES.

THE ORSINI BOMB OUTRAGE AT…

GROSS INHUMANITY IN A WORKHOUSE.".

A SHIP BURNT AT SEA.

THE SANDY POINT MUTINEERS.

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EXPLOSIONS IN MINES.

THE PHONOGRAPH.

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