Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

22 articles on this Page

TURKISH SOLDIERS.

THE NEW BRITISH IRONCLADS.

[No title]

TORPEDOES.

BREACH OF PROMISE.

News
Cite
Share

BREACH OF PROMISE. The Times has the following in an article bearing on the Herschell's Breach of Promise Bill: The exist- ing state of the law making a promise te marry a legal contract defeats its purpose by encouraging long engagements and endless delays. A man promises to marry, hastily, perhaps, and without due provision, bnt if he and the lady honestly wish for "love in a cottage," there can be no reason why they should not try it. The parents, however, especially on tbe lady's side, do not like this, and insist on the young people waiting indefinitely for better or more certain prospects. His attachment is expected to stimulate his professional exertion, or to overcome his inde- pendence of feeling, and drive him to seek a patron or cultivate some interests. Meanwhile there is generally a certain reserve imposed upon his communications with the lady; he is not to see her too often, or too much alone. He is to go about as an engaged man, and to observe the duties of that position. In fact, he is not to go about too much, or to be toe much in female company. Meanwhile no such restraints or limitations are placed en the lady, who goes to as many picnics, dances, garden parties, or excursions as she can get invitations for. All this time, if she changes her mind. it is only the privilege ef her sex. Her own bonds are silk, gossamer rather, while the gentleman's are iron manacles and fetters. This is to go on for years, and the gentleman is expected to be no worse for keeping, which the lady cer- tainly will be. The way to meet this one-sided scheme is to offer a promise on the condition of early performance, which will generally have the legitimate effect of preventing an engagement altogether. A promise for an indefinite period, to be fulfilled some time or other when circumstances are more propitious than now, is even worse than an international treaty warranted to stand for ever under every possible change of circumstances. Expe- rience, not of a pleasant sort. has lately shown that this is a folly, and nothing more. If people cannot marry now, there may be less reason, but there may be also greater reason why they should not marry five years hence. But it would always be far better that both should be at liberty to recognise the changes which time, separation, general society, and other reasons are sure to bring about. If this be thought an abandonment of that high principle and that fixity of purpose which are among our national virtues, then by all means let both parties accept the position of engaged persons—one already in heart and mind, but waiting for the happy day that is to remove the wall of circumstances now between them. Let not the lady be dressed like a May fly, let her not go about the freest of the free, open to flirt with any- body, because in her case flirtation is to lead to nothing, unless, indeed, she should think fit to break her bonds altogether.

EXECUTION AT WINCHESTER.

NAVAL PREPARATIONS.

ITHE DEFENCES OF 1SHE THAMES.

[No title]

THE BRADLAUGH-BESANT APPEAL.

A NEW ANIMAL.

[No title]

DOG LICENSES.

THE ORSINI BOMB OUTRAGE AT…

GROSS INHUMANITY IN A WORKHOUSE.".

A SHIP BURNT AT SEA.

THE SANDY POINT MUTINEERS.

[No title]

EXPLOSIONS IN MINES.

THE PHONOGRAPH.

[No title]

[No title]