Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

22 articles on this Page

TURKISH SOLDIERS.

THE NEW BRITISH IRONCLADS.

News
Cite
Share

THE NEW BRITISH IRONCLADS. Two powerful war vessels have been added to the navy of Gro,,tt Britain by the acquirement of the ironclad Payki Sherref, now in Millwall Docks, and her sister ship, at present unnamed, and on the stocks at the adjacent building yard of Messrs. Samuda, nearly opposite Greenwich. The latter vessel is far from complete, and has none of her armour fixed; but the Payki Sherref, which the Lords of the Ad- miralty recognise at present only by the title of B 71," is quite finished, and furnished ready for 1M, and the other ship is proposed to be like her in ev-ry respect. Technically speaking, the Payk; Sbfpref is an iron armour-cased corvette, with a raised fighting battery deck amidships. The battery deck rises from below the waterline to a height of about 18 feet, and mounts four 25-ton guns, 12 inch muzzle- loaders, which are already on board, having been pro- vided by Sir Win Armstrong when the ship was built for the Turkish Government, more than a year since,, and detained as contraband of war. Two of the guns fight on the port and two on the starboard side, each pair being provided with gun-metal racers, giving them such scope for traversing that they can fire direct fore and aft, or combinate upon one spot at 90 yards r»nee. There is ample room to work the guns, the battery deck being an octagon of about 60 feet; while the guns, which are somewhat short in the chase, are 16 feet in length. They are rifled with eight grooves, and en an increasing twist. The shot rises through a lift under the muzzle, and is carried along a bar overhead to the position most convenient for load- ing, tne cartridges also coming up from below through openings on the centre line. The pro- jectiles as well as the guns are already on board, consisting of 6-.0 12-inch shot and shell for the big guns, and some 200 for the 9-pounder guns, which will probably be mounted in the bows and astern. The larger projectiles comprise 240 chilled shell, on the Palliser principle, 100 chilled shot, 240 common shell, 70 shrapnel, and 170 segment shells. The armour-plating consists of a belt of 12-inch iron at the water- line, diminishing above and below to 8 inches, the thickness of iron protecting the battery varying from 91 to 101 inches. The main deck, which will be nearly level with the water, is composed of 3- inch plates of armour, encased in oak. Upon this main deck is erected a spar or hurricane deck, containing the oftleerie cabins and other appointments; but the as- sumption is that all this deck would be shot away in action, leaving only the armour-defended battery and submerged hull as a mark for the enemy. The designer of the ship was Hemit Pasha, of the Turkish navy, and for her length she is remarkably spacious. She measures between perpendiculars245 feet, and has a breadth of nearly 60 feet even at a few feet from the stem and stem. The saloon apartments are handsomely decorated and furnished, partly in the Turkish and partly in English fashion. The ship's crew, officers and men. will number 300. Her burden in tons is 3075, builder's measurement, and her draught of water 19 feet forward and 19 feet 6 inches aft. Her displaceaMnt at the lead line is 4777 feet, and the area of her midship section 895 68 square feet. She is propelled by a pair of engines constructed by Messrs. Maudslay and Field, having a nominal horse-power of 600. and 3900 indicated. The guaranteed speed is twelve knots an hour, but she has actually attained 12 99 knots on her trial. The armour-piercing projectiles for her heavy guns weigh each 6001bs., and arrangements are made for stowing 17 rounds with each gun. There is a steam-steering apparatus and wheels to be worked by band, both on the battery deck and under cover of the lower deck, and provision is made to cook for 350 men, while 13 tanks are on board to contain 8000 gallons of water. The Payki Sherref, of which Messrs. Samuda are also the builders, is to undergo some slight alterations. The other ship, now building, can be completed in a few months, and will be brought forward with all speed B."t.h ships have been surveyed and approved of by the Lords of the Admiralty, and the purchase concluded. An official survey has also been made of another Turkish ironclad, the Hamidie, detained under similar circumstances ia the Victoria Dock*. She is plated with twelve inches of iron on 14-inch teak, and two inner platea each of 2j incbes of iron, and is pierced for twelve 18 ton guns; supplemented by some lighter guns on the upper deck. but none of the guns are yet on board. She has a length of 380 feet with 60 feet beam, and her engines, which have been supplied by Messrs. Maudftiay, are exceptional ty powerful. She has no turrets, and fights her guns from the main deck. The purchase of this vessel is still under consideration, and there are one or two other ironclads in the docks near London which may ba obtained if required for the service of the British Government. -Z--

[No title]

TORPEDOES.

BREACH OF PROMISE.

EXECUTION AT WINCHESTER.

NAVAL PREPARATIONS.

ITHE DEFENCES OF 1SHE THAMES.

[No title]

THE BRADLAUGH-BESANT APPEAL.

A NEW ANIMAL.

[No title]

DOG LICENSES.

THE ORSINI BOMB OUTRAGE AT…

GROSS INHUMANITY IN A WORKHOUSE.".

A SHIP BURNT AT SEA.

THE SANDY POINT MUTINEERS.

[No title]

EXPLOSIONS IN MINES.

THE PHONOGRAPH.

[No title]

[No title]