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TURKISH SOLDIERS.

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TURKISH SOLDIERS. A writer in Matmttanfe Magazine for February says There are cowards and malingerers in all armies, though in the Turkish there are but few. Our ad- miration of the common soldier increased daily as we became more intimate with him. He is by nature a gentleman, always polite, cheerful, and brave- We saw regiments under all conditions. Even where the men came in weary, footsore, and fasting, we have seen them ordered on to fight, and they have gone without a murmur. We have met them in the clouds among the snow at Schipka, where they had been for weeks; we have been with them in victory and also in defeat; but they are always the same uncomplaining, faithful men, honest and good-natured. Constantly one sees a wounded mu helping another along, and it is a common thing, after a fight, to eee a woundeo eoldier carrying two rifles, so as to ease his eirarade, who may be weaker than himself for the Turk is very proud of bis arms, and would almost as soon lose bia hfe as the weapon entrusted to him. The IWhi-Bazouks and the Circassians are quite of a different stamp from the regular soldiery Thev are armed, but receive no pay, and live by plaoder. The Circassians are perhaps the most bloodthirsty of the two. Brewed in long homespun coats (something like ulsters) they have a soldier-like appearance; they are upright in their carriage, and have fierce aristocratic looks. They are excellent horsemen, and as a rule are brave, though perhaps better in a hand-to-hand fight than under fire; but many of them are thieving, fillainous brutes of the worst kind, and acknowledge no rule or discipline. Nevertheless, there lingers among them a certain sense of honour, although it is the proverbial honour of thieves. For instance, if a {>erson start on an expedition with them, as long as l- asts his property is perfectly safe; but immediately it is over, they feel no longer under any moral obb- gition and the next day, if they hare the chance, will rob him of all he has got One day, on a recon- noitring expedition, I was alone with about fifty Circassians, and lent my field-glasses and telescope to tome near me, to look at a force of Russian cavalry. The glasses were passed round from one to the other, till we had to advance, when they disappeared, and I never expected to get them back; but at the next halt they were returned to me. The Bashi- Basouk is simply a volunteer, who serves with- out pay for the chance of loot; and, as a rule, is as bad as the conditions of his service make him. Sis conduct has undoubtedly done much to embitter the war, and to bring unpopularity on the Turkish Government. There are some organised regiments of Bashi Basouks, but they are mostly employed as feelers for the army. They do not like going under fire, and are not to be relied on but they are often very useful for sneaking along under cover, and finding out the position of the enemy. It is they who plunder and murder the wounded on the battle-field. The regular Turkish soldier is never blood-thirsty, except perhaps during the excitement of battle, when both Russians and Tttrb are equally ferocious. We were present in six engagements and two retreats, and had eviiry oppor- tunity of seeing any acts of violence committed by the Turkish soldiery, but did not observe a single instance even of pillaging on the part of the re- gulars. In fact their conduct was always beyond praise, while their kindness, affection, and unselfish- ness for one another and for their officers is very touching. | ■ 1 ■ i I.

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