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- INS ANITY AMONG THE UPPER…

.;'.A PRIMITIVE STATE. ';^

BELLS.

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THE KAFFIR WAR. I

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DISASTERS AT SEA.

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DISASTERS AT SEA. A Lloyd's telegram from Madras states that the British Sceptre arrived there on the 12th of January from Melbourne. The master, Captain Richards, reports, while at Keeling Island, the Cheviot barque arrived there with a portion of the crew of the Glene- richt, of Liverpool, from Sunderland for Singapore, coal laden, consisting of the master, his wife and two children, and fifteen of the crew. The master of the Glenericht stated that about the 25th or 26th of November the cargo was found to be on fire from spontaneous combustion, and all efforts to put it out having proved ineffectual she was abandoned on the 29th, in lat. 32 S., long. 89 E, the crew leaving in four boats. The ship was then burning fore and aft, and the three masts had gone over the side. After being together three or four days two of the boats parted company during the night. Eleven days after leaving the ship the master's and two other boats fell in with the Cheviot, on board of which vessel they were taken to the Keeling Island, and there the crew were divided into three portions, six being taken to Madras by the British Sceptre, six taken on board the Theophane, bound for Calcutta, and the master and his family and three of the crew being retained by the Cheviot, bound for Rangoon. A Lloyd's telegram from Marbella, under date the 31st of January, says: "A fire broke out on the 30th of January on board the Sainton, steamer, arrived here from Almeira. It occurred at 7 p.m., and was caused by the accidental upsetting of the riding lanop, which set fire to some bales of esparto grass, and, in spite of every effort, the fire spread so rapidly that the sailors had barely time to save their lives. A strong west wind fanned the flames, and soon the whole vessel except the stem, was enveloped. The vessel burnt all night, and about 9 a.m. sank in four fathoms of water. As regards the cargo all the grass is burnt, and the nuts and oranges are very much damaged. A quantity of the latter have floated out of the hold and washed away. The Piaster thinks the engines will prove to be little damaged. The vessel lies in an upright position, 300 yards from shore, and is favourably situated for any operations on her that may be deemed desirable." The Bokeby Hall, Captain dark, from Iquique for Queenstown for orders, was spoken off Crookhaven on the 4th of February. The captain reported that on the 11th of November last, in lat. 47 S., long. 84 W., Peter Conway, the carpenter, fell overboard, and the boat sent to the rescue, after being away one hour and a half, had nearly got back safe to the ship when the breaking top of a wave swamped her. Another boat was launched aa quickly as possible, but it was too late, for she found only the life jackets supplied to those in the first boat, and with them the life buoy which had been thrown to the carpenter. The names of those drowned were: J. W. Spence (second mate), Peter Oonway (carpenter), Walter Paton, A.B., Matthew Ryan, A.B., Benjamin Stevens, A.B., and William Philip Eddy ^apprentice). The Greek brig Antares has been in collision off theLisard with the ship Atlantic, and it is feared that four of her crew have been drowned. The captain, mate, and three of the crew got on board the Atlantic and were brought to Cardiff.

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THE ROAD OF THE DEAD.

THE WARRINGTON POISONING CASE.

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MR. H. M. STANLEY AND HIS…

A REMARKABLE PLOT. tbft

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ALLEGED LOAN SWINDLE. If;,,