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- INS ANITY AMONG THE UPPER…

.;'.A PRIMITIVE STATE. ';^

BELLS.

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BELLS. (from the" Globe.") Shakespeare's plays are full of allusions to bells— the bells that have knelled to church, the midnight bell, the sullen bell,the 'larum bell, the funeral bell, tbe scaring ben, that dreadful bell that frights the we from her propriety," the merry bells, the melan- choly bells, the sweet bells jangled out of tune, and so forth—to every tone and utterance of bells the great heart of Shakespeare seems to have been as sus- ceptible as the glassy surface of water to a breath of wind. In or about Shakespeare's time seems, indeed, to have been the time in which we English were more passionately fond of bell music than at any other period of our history. Among the educated classes in the time of Queen Mary we are told the enjoyment to be derived from a good Deal of bells was so highly esteemed that the Eromise to give Oxford the finest peal in England was eld out as the greatest allurement that could be vised to bring students to that university. Thia at least was the proposal of Tresham, its Vice-Chan- eelior, wwM himself gave a somewhat guahing proof of his own susceptibility to the voice of. a bell when the predecessor ef "Old Tom" was brought from Osney, and first swung out its topes from the gate-tower of Ohristchurch. 0, delicate and sireet harmoay J" he exclaimed. 0 beautiful Mary!" —the bell had been christened Mary, after the Queen, whom Tresham was, perhaps, intending to compli- ment—" How musically she lOundal how strangely she pleaseth my ear 1" How different may be the musie of bells in different ears, and even to the same ears under different circumstances, it would be easy to nndmanyatotieatoilluatfate. There is the weU-known story of the lady to whom the sound of the evening bells came singing clearly and unmistakably," Yes, marry your valet; yes, marry your valet; yes, marry your valetbat to whom when, after she bad taken the irrevocable step, the same Wis seemed to have been saying all the time, Don't marry year valet; don't marry your valet; don't marry your valet." The story of Dick Whittington may be nothing more than a fable, but it very well illustrates the capability of speech which most persons at some time or other have probably felt it eaay to attribute to bells.

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