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JVABIHS AND HYDROPHOBIA.

A DISAPPOINTED BRIDEGROOM.

.DISASTERS AT SEA.I

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." THE PEACE TO CQMi-."

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LIFE IN LONDON: j 8IAD IX…

SEASIDE SWINDLERS.

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THURSDAY ISLAND.

JUDGES' CIRCUITS.'

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GOURDS. MARCH TQ philippof^HS;:

BREACH OF PROMISE CASE.

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A JAPANESE EXHIBITIONS

THE'REMAINS OF QUEEN KATHARINE…

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THE'REMAINS OF QUEEN KATHARINE DE VALOIS. The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon presided at a meeting qf the Society of Antiquaries, held at Burlington House, when the Very Rev. Dean Stanley read a paper upon the depositories of Katharine d' Valois, the Queen of Henry V., the remains of Ü18 Queen having been re-deposited near the chantry of the Abbey, after many romwkable nmovah an&vicw' tudes. The dean exhibited upon a screen the drawing* made of the contents of a box in which in 1778 the re mains of Queen Katharine de Valois were laid in St. Nichelses Chapel, in the vaultofth,,bVilliers',boyoud tbO tomb of the Percies, which was opened in Deoember last upon the occasion of the burial in the Abbey of the lat* Lord Percy, when the opportunity was taken, by the sanc- tion of the authorities and the consent of her Majesty the Queen, to fittingly encase the dust of de Yalois, and to restore the ashes to near their origin** iresting-plaee. The original tomb was in the chaDttf of Henry V., which stands on the original BelJ- quary of the Abbey. Katharine de Valois, the Dean remarked—the Kate of the never- to-be-forgotten seeoe in Shakespeare's Henry V.was on the day of b^ funeral conveyed by water to the Tower of London where a service was said in the chapel of which SM was the patron; thence to St. Paul's where anotlo service was held thence it was brought to the Abbey. Upon the death of her 00 Henry VI., it was proposed to move we body further down, and to erellt a tomb moto "honourably apparalled but k remained undi* turbed until Henry the YIL's chapel was when the bones of the grandam of that monarch we*2 placed in a wooden box and removed to a spot eal^ "the Friars," piobably from the monks having hibited relics there. Various writers, the dean showed, testified to the fact that the bones We openly exhibited, lying above-ground in a woocw, box, and Fuller, the author of "Lives of Worthier was among those who saw them, ai.d he gives in h* writings a quaint anecdote to account for the gular fact of the bones being above- ground upward'' then, of 200 years after they had been Gtyk mitted to the earth. Till the 18th century tb were thus exposed, and the Westminster scholars o1 those days were stated to have misused the remain** and the'box in which they were contained wae tb« £ locked up, and they were placed in the tomb beyof^ the Percies. There they rested until, as stated, tn* death of Lord Percy, in December liast, rendered^ possible to obtain the restoration of the remains t°' fitting depository. A space was made into the where the box was laid, and the box was found nea<v rotted away. Upon it was a leaden plate with inscription: "nKatherine de Valois,Queen of V., 1437, deposited in this Chapel of St. Nichofr by Benjamin Fidoe, Clerk of Works of Westmins^ Abbey, 1778." The box was only nailed rough way, and through part of the box having faV away the skull was visible. The upper part ot JS body had been, previous to its last burial in l"' much disturbed, and several portions of it were these facts testifying to the gross carlesaness with the remains were treated in bygone times. The d«*r described the spot where the remains of the^^8! Princess and English Queen, fittingly placed 1B proper covering, with the old plate inside, werej^ entombed between the Plantagenets and the and near to the memorials of her husband's vieto* by which he won her to be his bride. l'

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