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JVABIHS AND HYDROPHOBIA.

A DISAPPOINTED BRIDEGROOM.

.DISASTERS AT SEA.I

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." THE PEACE TO CQMi-."

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LIFE IN LONDON: j 8IAD IX…

SEASIDE SWINDLERS.

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THURSDAY ISLAND.

JUDGES' CIRCUITS.'

[No title]

GOURDS. MARCH TQ philippof^HS;:

BREACH OF PROMISE CASE.

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A JAPANESE EXHIBITIONS

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A JAPANESE EXHIBITIONS The conductor of Messrs. Cook's "Round the World tour, writing from the steamship Hiroshima Marn, under date Nagasaki, Nov. 27, says: "Dudag our visit at Tokio this year, one of the graat events and attractions going on was the Hakurart-Kuwai, or national exhibition, at the Park of Uyeno which we were fortunate enough to witness and which does Japan great credit. It was opened on the 21st of August ltist. The exhibition buildings are six in num- ber, and form an irregular sexagen, within the liufe~# of which the grounds are tastily laid out in fioWv> ■ beds, and have in their centre an artificial circular lake, fed through pumpa from the big pond Shino-badzu-no-ike; but the grounds extend beyond the sides of this sexagon; they are, in fact. said to cover an area of 20,000 tsubo, or 720,000 square feet, and in these more distant places are to be found various structures, refreshment stalls, eating houses, &c. The six principal exhibition buildings bear each of them an inscription indicating their contents. Turning left from the entrance we find these buildings ranged in the following order—1, Horticultural hall; 2, Machinery hall; 3, Western hall; 4, Fine Arts gallery; 5, Eastern hall; and 6, Agricultural hall. These are all connected with each other by a shorty covered gallery, and are profusely decorated both inside and outside with flags of various colours. The structures being, with one exception, only intended to remain as long as the exhibition laøtø- viz., until the 1st of December this year-they are un- pretending in appearance, and have been built in the most economical manner. They are all of wood, one storied, roofed with galvanised iron, floored with cement, lit by windows in the walls, and by sky-lights in the roof, and painted both inside and outside with colours pleasing to the eye. Each building is con- structed in form of a rectangle, but they vary con- siderably in size. The one exception from the general method of construction is the building for the fine arts, which is intended to remain standing as a memorial after the exhibition shall have been closed. In every department of manufacturing industry, silks, lacquer- ware, bronzes, porcelains, and the thousand-and- one articles of dailylife, the exhibition teems with the best examples of what the artists and artisans of Japan of to-day can produce. Old curios and anti- quities are not shown, and the lover of things of the past must look elsewhere for a gratification of his curiosity. The Exhibition Bureau has published in the vernacular a guide book and a voluminous catalogue* The number of the exhibitors is about 18,000, and the articles exhibited about 30,000, valued at a total of 175,228 yen or dollars. The Japanese manufacturer* whose intelligent, ingenious, and artistic toil has mad* the exhibition what it is, are to be warmly congratu- lated on their meritorious success in almost every de* partment of human industry." J <*

THE'REMAINS OF QUEEN KATHARINE…

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