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---.-. MR. T. BKASSEY. MP,…

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I,THE WESTMEATH WILL CASE.

: A FRENCH MARRIAGE, AND WHA3…

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IA FORGOTTEN HERO.

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THE FRENCH ARTILLERY. j

LORD ROSSLYN'S INTERVIEW WITH…

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THE NORTH UNST LIGHTHOUSE.

TEN DEARS' EXPLORATION.

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-::.. WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

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I FOREIGN AND COLONIAL.

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I FOREIGN AND COLONIAL. An outbreak having occurred in the Chilian pena colony at Punta Arenas, Patagonia (says the Standard), the convicts attacked Sandy Point, firing into the British Consulate with a 12 pounder gun. The Vice-Oonsul took to Right, and was pursued and fired at, but he managed to escape from the shore in his boat, and was picked up by a passing steamer. i Intelligence published lately concerning trade de- pression in America is confirmed by some facts pub- lished in a Chicago journal, the Railway Age, aa to th(^f enormous losses sustained last year and the yeai' before. One-fifth of all the railway property in the United States, it seems, has come to grief in the period referred to. There were actually sold under foreclosure duing the two years eighty-four railways, which in the gross carried on a traffic over 7721 miles of road, and represented in value a sum of money not short of 417 millions of dollars. In the same period foreclosure proceedings were begun in 44 railways, while in 16 others sales were ordered these two groups, collectively making up a total of 60 lines, represent 575 millions of dollars. There are indications that the United States Govern- ment will accept the award of the Halifax Fishery Commission, acquiescing in the British view. An unanimous verdict was not necessary under the treaty. The Secretary of State is now considering the subject. The police at Geneva are carrying out the recent decree of the Conseil d'Etat with reference to the foreign Roman Catholic priests. They have refused permission to two curia who have been in the Canton twenty years, and against whom no offence is alleged, to continue their ministrations. As this proceeding is regarded as involving a violation of the Constitution, it will probably be resisted and may bring the local authorities in conflict with the Federal Courts. The scientific expedition to Lake Lob-Nor, sent out by the St. Petersburg Geographical Society, under the command of Colonel Prjewalski, has yielded most interesting results in every direction, and is of par- ticular importance with regard to the exploration of Kashgar. The new details obtained in reference to Lake Lob-Nor are remarkable. The expedition con- tinued its way from Korla, following the course of the Tarim River down to its confluence with the Ro- kala Darja. On their way to the Lob-Nor the travel- lers passed the ruins of three cities. Lr.ke Lob-Nor is of a marshy nature; its length is some 100 kilo- metres, by only twenty kilometres breach. Colonel Prjewalski explored the western and southern shores, and through the current of the Tarim River reached the middle of the lake. There the shallowness of the water and impenetrable vegetation prevented further progress. Almost the whole surface of the lake is thickly covered with reedy vegetation. The inhabi- tants of the Kara Kurchintz district, on the shores of the Lake Lob-Nor, are on the lowest step of civiliaa- tion. They live along the shores as well as on islands in the lake, in miserable huts con- structed of reeds and branches twisted together. The whole of their possessions are their clothes, which barely cover their nakedness, and are made of the fibres of a kind of lake weed, their nets, and their canoes, which are hollow trunks of trees. Metal objects, such as knives, hatchets, See., are extaemely rare among them. Colonel Prjewalski, besides his ethnographical results, has collected rich materials for ornithological investigations. He re- ports that it is impossible to conceive the enormous number of migratory birds which, on their journey from southern countries to the north, or vice versd, select Lake Lob-Nor as a halting place. At present the Russian traveller has wended his way southward, and is engaged in the exploration of Tibet. A correspondent at Peking writes to the London and China Telegraph: Shansi and the southern parts of Chihli are suffering dreadfully. Tseng, the governor of the former province, reports that there are three or four millions of people that must be fed till next year, and that one tael per head will be necessary to meet the want, and he recommends bestowing rewards, official positions, &c., (not an uncommon mode of raising money in China) on the charitable who come forward with contributions at present. The famine is so severe that cannibalism is reported. Foreigners are moving in the matter here and at Shanghai; but the call upon last year for the famine in Shangtung, to which so liberal a response was given, coup'.ed with our own Indian famine, the tearing up of the Woosung Railway, and the report that the native merchants made over a million of taels profit on last year's silk &c., lhave tended rather to dry up the channels of foreign charity. We had a fall of snow and rain a few days ago, which promises well for the wheat crop of next year." The Athenseum says Mr. Jon Jonsson, the secre- tary of the Governor of Iceland, is now industriously occupied in the study of trials by juries in England, and in the pursuit of records hearing on the early history of this subject. Iceland seems to be waking up to the memory of her former self. In her laws and literature are found the earliest and at the same time the fullest records of trial by jury." Certain antiquaries hold it to be an institution brought into England by the Danes, which in itself is very likely- indeed, extremely so-although it does not prove its prior non-existence among the Anglo-Saxons, kith and kin of the Danes themselves. After the union with Norway in the latter half of the 13th century trial by jury fell into desuetude in Iceland. Now that the Danes are, after laborious inquiries, on the point of adopting the English mode of procedure with regard to the jury, Iceland wants to inquire for herself, too, on the point. The land tax in Egypt is collected from the villages or communes through the headman or sheik-el-beled. This sheik is summoned before the Moudir, or Governor of the Province, and told that a certain sum must be forthcoming from his district. The sheik dare not say nay. He goes back to his village and sets about the collection. Produce, cattle, implements, poultry, the jewels of the women must all be sold, if necessary, to meet the demand. Even land is for- feited rather than the tax should not be paid. The koorbash, or whip of hippopotamus hide, is said still to act as a stimulus for the unready. Well, low prices of produce and long-continued pressure for taxes, re- gular and irregular, have nearly drained the peasants dry. Some of the sheiks have realised this, and it is said that a deputation from the Delta went to Cairo last month and urged upon the Government the real state-of things. The storv does not go on to tell the result of this legal resistance, but it is very significant in a country where abeolute submission is second nature. King Humbert is, at least in the opinion of Austrian statesmen, more or less identified with the ambitions and aspirations of Young Italy, which undoubtedly menace the territorial integrity—perhaps thp very existence—of an Empire which has already been shorn twice of its fair proportions, and both times to the material aggrandisement of Italy. What King Victor would and would not do under the influence of certain possible eventualities was pretty accurately ap- praised by the master-minds of Northern and Central Europe; King Humbert is, as it were, an unknown quantity suddenly and unexpectedly imported into the problem of Austria's future.

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