Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

---.-. MR. T. BKASSEY. MP,…

[No title]

I,THE WESTMEATH WILL CASE.

: A FRENCH MARRIAGE, AND WHA3…

[No title]

IA FORGOTTEN HERO.

[No title]

THE FRENCH ARTILLERY. j

LORD ROSSLYN'S INTERVIEW WITH…

[No title]

THE NORTH UNST LIGHTHOUSE.

TEN DEARS' EXPLORATION.

News
Cite
Share

TEN DEARS' EXPLORATION. At he present day (says the Times) when railways and steamers take a traveller so rapidly over his journey; when the Challenger took oniv three years ^d a Tialf to explore the great oceans; when the English Polar Expedition was away only seventeen months when Stanley made his famous journey down the Congo, crossing the half of Africa in nine months; when Nordenskjold takes only a few week* in summer to go from Norway to the mouth of the Yenisei and back; when one can travel round the world in two months and a half; it sounds strange that an exploring journey in South America should occupy nearly ten year s, and that during this long time we should hear so little of the explorers and see so little of the results. Such has been the work, from 1868 to 1877 of two German explorers, Drs. Reiss and Stiibel; and Dr. Petermann informs us that from what he has seen of the results they are to the highest degree com- prehensive and important. The aim of the expedi- tion was tie study and exploration of the volcanic regions or South America, specially that of Columbia and Ecuador. For six years were Drs. Reiss and Stubel occupied alone with the mountain region for Merveo, Honda, and Bogota in the north, to Cuen9» in the south, carrying on their »! • A difficulties, and often af w ,°LHont Blanc. On account ° e, the country, the thinness and uC -nim- Population, and its few resources, ^M^^llWer6 ^Pdled to travel with a large 1 mu an a7.efaSe twenty-five men and twenty I exp-^ltl0n COst something like 300,000 w JL of «"*e lands "lies half-way between absolute; barbarism and European civilisa- tion and the difficulties which the travellers had to surmount were, though of a different kind,, little less than those which Stanley had to face in crossing Afnca. The possessions of the original inhabitants JifTe a f6 conquest been wasted, and the present lords 0f the land have onlv been able to destroy the old without put- ting anything similar in its place. The vio- lent political commotions, the almost chronic state of56T?paS0nu-hlnd!T an? healthy progress. The char- culfcure is significant; for example, at P«p yan and Pasto, both University towns, in the former, there is scarcely a sheet of writing paper to ^bought, far iess a bookin Pasto the belief pre- vailed that it would be an easy matter fer the ,ers PUJ an end to the outbreaks of the neighbouring volcano, and when Dr. Beiss stayed m the town he was waited on for this purpose K from all the authorities, by the ..the University, and the priesthood. Superstition, indolence, and drunkenness are chronic among the inhabitants. "The normal condition of the people is gross drunkenness." The richest and most fruitful regions have often no population; in the district Pachaquiaro there was found only a single Indian and a single canoe, and years may pass before another canoe be seen in the navigable rivers of this unWlually rich and extensive region..The ungenial weather rOi theee high regions, the utter want of com- fort, in the houses, often the impossibility of obtaining are, and other drawbacks, sorely tried the endurance of the patient explorers. A few of the results of these travels. have been published from time to time ia foreign journals, but it will take years to give them to the world, probably in the form Of monographs, which will take their place among the classics of exploration. Dr. Petermann statee that one of the most interesting results of this expedition le the series of oil paintings which Dr. gtubel has Drought home, of the scenes of his and his companions travels and researches. Dr. Petermann states that he has never seen anything equal to them. They are by an artist named Rafael Troya, and there are about seventy altogether, some of them being upwards or six feet wide. They will give a more vivid and faithful idea of this region than has ever been given before, or than could be done by any other means.

[No title]

-::.. WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

[No title]

I FOREIGN AND COLONIAL.

[No title]