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---.-. MR. T. BKASSEY. MP,…

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I,THE WESTMEATH WILL CASE.

: A FRENCH MARRIAGE, AND WHA3…

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IA FORGOTTEN HERO.

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THE FRENCH ARTILLERY. j

LORD ROSSLYN'S INTERVIEW WITH…

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THE NORTH UNST LIGHTHOUSE.

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THE NORTH UNST LIGHTHOUSE. (Abridged from the Globe?) Of all the lighthouses around our coasts there "is, perhaps, no one that would present to the mind of the ordinary landsman an idea of greater loneliness aRd dreariness as a place of residence than that situated on North Unst. This crag his the distinction of being the most northerly point of the Queen's British dominions, and a more uninviting perch for perpetual residence-eholt of the end of the protruding pole which jocular draftsmen are fond of representing as the centre of the Arctic regions—it would be difficult to imagine. North Unst is a craggy peak, near the Shetland .Isles, rising from the stormy seas north of Scotland, like a huge sucar-loaf to the height of 201 feet. The apex of this conical peak is just large enough to take the base of a light- house sufficient for the exhibition of a light and the accommodation of three men. The rock did not afford foothold for premises large enough for their families, however, and they consequently hive to lodge upon one of the Shetland Islands about four miles off. The desirability of permanently maintaining a light on North Unst was made mani- fest by this temporary structure, and as it had also become quite clear that an alti- tude of 200 feet was no safeguard against the waves, it was determined to erect a light tower as high above the rock as many of the light- houses around our coast stand above level ground. The present lantern, which is a fixed dioptric light of the first class, gleams out some 250 feet above those boisterous seas, where it has been found to be 0f the utmost utility during tbe long night of the Shetland Isles, which in winter may be reckoned to extend from about three in the afternoon till nine in the morning. During this dreary stretch of time a light has not only to be kept burning, but must be burning with its utmost brilliancy, and must never be left for an instant. The rales of the Northern Lights Commissioners require that each man shall take his turn beneath the lantern, and shall, under no circumstances whatever, leave his post without summoning some one to relieve him, which he must do, not by going to fetch some one, but by a bell or whistle. A four hours' watch is the rule, and dis- missaf se5yi^e, Jf. *he regulation penalty for the slightest breach of this prime injunction. Amid the howling of the storm and the wild dash of this desolate sea, one or other of the three men employed here is always, during the night, on duty just beneath the lantern, the monotony of hi, fourVours' watch being broken perhaps by the necessity of going out- side to clear the face of the light from a drift of snow, or by the startling thud of some benighted sea bird that has come headlong into the dazzling glare like a moth into a candle. It is a very curious fact that lighthouses do thus attract stray birds. The lights on the Atlantic coaJta of America are said to occasion the destruction of 100,000 birds annually, the rocks around them being at certain times of the year, when birds are emigra- ting, often found in the morning to be literally strewn with their mangled bodies. Occasionally on our own coasts a large bird has been known to crash through the g ass. The light-keeper is prepared for thi0- H«keeP?f Bheet of glass ready to be instantly placed over the aperture. In very cold weather t^e g! u?- obscured by moisture within the lantern, a.nd this, of Course, has to be recti- u l theae occa8ional incidents, the light itself must never be left unregarded. A flrst-claa light, such as that at North Unst, is produced by a lamp having four concentric wicks, the largest of which is three and a half inches in diameter, the o.l being continually pumped up by machinery from a cistern beneath/^ An excessive supply is maintained, the surplus flowing back into the cistern from which it was pumped. The wick-holders are thus kept cool so long a. the mechanism of the lamp is going satisfactorily. The proper working of the apparatus is signified by the tinkle of a small bell, the stoppage ot which makes known that the oil supply has tailed, and that unless the keeper spnngs to his ladder without a moment's delay the fierce heat of the dame will melt the solder near it, and utterly destroy the lamp. The necesssity for stringent rules and for trustworthy men is obvious enough, and it certainly is astonishing that such men are to be found willmg to spend their working lives Dn the peak of North Umat, with one of the Shetland 181e8 for" home."

TEN DEARS' EXPLORATION.

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-::.. WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

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I FOREIGN AND COLONIAL.

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