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---.-. MR. T. BKASSEY. MP,…

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I,THE WESTMEATH WILL CASE.

: A FRENCH MARRIAGE, AND WHA3…

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IA FORGOTTEN HERO.

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THE FRENCH ARTILLERY. j

LORD ROSSLYN'S INTERVIEW WITH…

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SPECULATIONS OF A SHIPPING CLBRX.-At the Liverpool Police-court, before Mr. Baffles, James Burnett, a genteel-looking young man, was charged with embezzlement. The prisoner, who was about 26 years of age, hed been three years in the employ- ment of Messrs. Allan Brothers, shipowners, as an assistant clerk. in the inward freight department, re- ceiving a salary £80 for the first year and Xllo for each of the other years. It was stated that on the 15th of December last he received .£460 aø a deposit from Mr. W. E. Henson, corn broker, and on the 21st of December a sum of £ 450 from Messrs. Clunie, corn merchants, for neither of which sums had he accounted to the cashier, in consequence of Messrs. Allan Brothers hearing the prisoner speculated in petroleum and corn he was discharged at the end of last year, but at that time the firm did not know he was a de- faulter, the transactions for which he had received deposits not having reached the stage for final settlement. On the 14th of this month in- quiries were made and the default discovered. On being questioned the prisoner admitted that he had received £ 450 from Messrs. Clunie, and was negotiating with his friends to pay iVa 0V8r three days. He also acknow- ladged havmg received the, £ 460 from Mr. Henson, and said he had lost the money in speculations in corn and petroleum. It had since been ascertained that several firms in Liverpool had transactions with the prisoner, without making any inquiries as to how the young man could possibly be in a position to pay margins, amounting in some cases to the whole of hia yearly salary, on speculative purchases—which were not purchases for delivery—in corn and petroleum. They had traced in that way about £ 560 which had been paid on tht se marginll." After evidence bad been given, the prisoner was committed for trial at the Borough Sessions. AN IRISH DIVOBCE CASE.-The oaae of Mrs. Sarah Parker, a well-known lecturer on weman's rights and spiritualism, and who seeks a divorce from he* husband on the ground of cruelty, came before Judge Warren in the Matrimonial Court on a motion to stay proceedings, on the ground that they were barred by the deed of separation entered into between the parties in 1866. Mrs. Parker, who conducted her own case, had, it appeared, travelled abroad during the past ten years, and was travelling in Peru in 1876, when she Wis informed that her husband desired her to return. She returned accordingly and they were reconciled, he presenting her with a handsome ring in token of a new betrothal. In consequence, how- ever, of his intemperance and his threats she was unable to live with him. Her husband was addicted to groll habits of intemperance, and was never in a state for any decent woman to live with him. The Judge refused to stay the proceedings, and the case, which is fixed for the 1st of February, will accord- ingly proceed. THE CATTLE TRADE.-Iatroduced by Mr. Jacob Bright, M.P., a large deputation from the rr°'f^n Trade Association, representing the United Kingdom, had an interview with the Duke of Richmond and Gordon, at Whitehall, to protest against any restrictions being placed upon the importation of cattle from abroad which bis grace might contemplate embodying in his bill Jo be introduced shortly. Bepresentatives from Manchester, Leeds, Liverpool, Glasgow, Ire- land, and different towns were present. Several gentlemen having spoken, the Duke of Rich- mond and Gordon said in reply, admitting the im- portance of the subject, that a Select Committee of top House of Commons having made a report to Parltament, he did not think it the time or place to comment upon the evidence taken in the document itself. The Government had thought fit to prepar3 a measure respecting the question, which he would be- fore long have the honour to introduce into the House of Lords. Under those circumstances, it would be impossible for him to enter into details at present, but due attention would be given by him to the state ments he had heard. THE PJUNCE CONSORT STATUB AT CAM- BRIDGB UXVJSJXMD.—Mr. Foley's statue of the Prince JJonsort at Oambridge was unveiled by the Prince of waies, who, in reply to an address from the Univer- sity, expressed the pleasure which he experienced at revisiting that seat of learning, and in recalling to his mind the agreeable recollections of his undergra- d,te.days. The. interest which the Prince Consort took. in everything relating to the welfare and Progress of the University was well known, and it was a source of gratification to his Royal Highness to witness the respect which the members of the university showed to his memory by erecting this statue. Ma. H. M. STANLEY IN LONDON.—Mr. H. M. ^•ched London on Tuesday evening. Both at Boulogne and on landing at Folkestone he received marked attention from the local authorities, and at the latter place was greeted with cheers and other de- monstrations of welcome by a large number of persons who awaited the arrival of the steamer in which he crossed the Channel. A special saloon carriage was placed at his disposal by the South-Eastern Bail way Company for the journey to London. THEBATJSNBD STRIKE AT LYONS.—A strike is threatened amongst the workmen of Lyons. The weavers in particular are organising an extensive movement or resistance to the reduction of wages lnaposed by the masters. In all the silk manufac- tories the greatest excitement prevails, and discussions are taking place daily with the view of bringing the parties to an understanding. The men have pre- sented an ultimatum to the Masters' Association, and the future action of both employers and employed will depend on the answer to this document, which is now eagerly awaited. ACTION BY A LADY AGAINST HER HUSBAND. -In the Queen's Bench Division a lady named Bowen sued her reputed husband, Colonel West, for damages for the non-performance of an agreement by which the defendant agreed to pay her X100 per annum for the maintenance of herself and children for the term of her natural life. The defence was that the defendant agreed to pay £ 100 per annum for his children during their minority, and whilst the plaintiff continued single, and that the payment should cease on the children attaining their majority. One had died, and the other was now 23 years of age. Both the plaintiff and the defendant went into the witness- box. The jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff- damages £50, the amount of the two quarters' arrears claimed. FOBMGN POTATOES.—In the last twelve months the declared value of potatoes imported in- creased to £ 2,348,693 from £ 1,742,285 in 1876.

THE NORTH UNST LIGHTHOUSE.

TEN DEARS' EXPLORATION.

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-::.. WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

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I FOREIGN AND COLONIAL.

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