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---.-. MR. T. BKASSEY. MP,…

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I,THE WESTMEATH WILL CASE.

: A FRENCH MARRIAGE, AND WHA3…

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COLOURS FBOM COAL.-Professor ArooatroDg delivered a lecture the other evening on this subject at the London Institution. After explaining the retert, condenser; exhauster, scrubber, and purifier through which the products of the distillation of coal pass before they issue as the gas we ordinarily use for illu- mination, lie showed how, in the condenser, coal tar is collected from which such beautiful colours for dyeing are now obtained. In a historic sketch it was shown thatacolouring mater wasobtained bydifferent chemists from different sources, coal tar among them, which was afterwards found to have in each case the same chemical composition. As indigo, called by the Portuguese anil, was one of the sources, this colour- yielding compound was called aniline. It was Boon found that though aniline was yielded from coal tar in but-small quantities, benzol was yielded plentifully, and that, by the addition of nitric acid to it, nitre- benzol was formed, and this, when submitted to the action of reduoing agents, was converted into aniline. Thus a. cheap a-nd plentiful source of aniline from coal ter was some twenty years ago discovered. From this aniline we have dyes of violets, reds, yellow, green, blue, and many newly-discovered shades. Since Eng. land has so large a oupply of coal it might have been expected that she would soon have been independent of the supply of. Mumal and vegetable dyes from abroad, and have been the greatest col our,'producing country in the world. As Professor Hofmann ex- pressed in his report on the chemical products at the 1862 Exhibition: "She may before long send her eoal-derived blues to indigo-growing India; her tar- distilled crimson to cochineal-producing Mexico; and her fossil substitutes for quercitron and saf- flower to China, Japan, and the ether countries whence these articles are now derived." This has, however, not been realised, and England 's gradually falling further and further behind Germany and Franee. The reason is-that our manufacturers do not attempt to employ the co-opera- tion of skilled chemists. If they were to seek them in England, they would not obtain them, as there are so few that have had the training requisite to conduct the work. We have in England no school where in- struction is given in the particular kind of chtinical work that is required. This result Professor Arm. strong attributed partly to the indifference of our Universities to the practical wants of the country. ROYAL COUBTSHIP BY TBLBPHONR.- The Madrid correspondent of the Times says: The King spends with his. bride all the time allowed him by etiquette and public affairs. He hastens to Araniuez where she is staying, and during the journey the Royal Lieanderwill sometimes look out at the carriage window to seeon the. horizon the bare treesunder which Philip IT. conspired against the conscience of the world. When he returns from Aranjuez his impatience leads him to a part of the palace where modern science has placed its latest discovery at the service of the Royal lover, and annihilates the space which for two days longer separatee him frem his bride. A telephone, in fact, has been fitted up connecting one of the King's rooms with that of Princess Mercedes, and enabling them to con- verse together free from indiscreet eyes and ears. Strange to think that the telephone should thus get the better of the traditional and implacable etiquette of a Court where the King cannot get an egg boiled without six successive messengers and sixteen paira of hands. Yet more strange is a love so rarely found in the loftiest stations, and which could only spring up and gain strength because two hearts met in the soli- tude of exile far from the factitious pomps of Courtly constraint. CCBIOUS SWINDLE.—At the Southwark Polloe- court a woman, who has a stationer's shop, applied for Hdvice, stating that she had been swindled. A female, who said she was employed at a young ladies' seminary, called and gave a large order for marking ink, which she, not having at the moment, promised to obtain for her customer. Shortly afterwards a man with a horse and trap, who repretented himself as an agent for an ink maker, came and supplied her with several dozens, which cost her £ 2 odd. The ink, however, proved to be worthless, and the female never came back. TKLRPHONB ^ompany-—A financial contem- porary hears that, with a view to utilising what is really a discovery of one of the secrets of nature- a discovery strangely reserved for the present day- a Telephone Company has been formed, under compe- { ISS'ZrtS? pr°"pectu' » KWj to be J la8nehed shortly.

IA FORGOTTEN HERO.

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THE FRENCH ARTILLERY. j

LORD ROSSLYN'S INTERVIEW WITH…

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THE NORTH UNST LIGHTHOUSE.

TEN DEARS' EXPLORATION.

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-::.. WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

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I FOREIGN AND COLONIAL.

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