Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

---.-. MR. T. BKASSEY. MP,…

[No title]

I,THE WESTMEATH WILL CASE.

News
Cite
Share

I, THE WESTMEATH WILL CASE. The great will case <ifthe» Bar! of Longford against Purdon was settled in the Appeal Court, Dublin, on Saturday. It was an appeal by Mr. Wellington Purdon and others from the decision of the" Judge of theOourt of Probate, granting a new trial in the will case of the Earl of Longford tI. Purdon, in which a jury, after a trial of twenty-two days, had set aside the will of the late Adolphus Cooke,' of Cooks- borough, county WeStmeath, by which testator, left his estates, worth £ 5000 a year, with an addi- tional reversionary interest of X2000 a year, to the third son of the Earl of Longford. The defendant was the heir-at-law of the tes- tator, whose will was disputed on the ground of testa- mentary incapacity, undue influence, and fraud. The evidence given in support of the plea of incapacity consisted chiefly of the relation of incidents in the testator's life which it was contended showed that he was of eccentric habits. He expressed disbelief in the existence of a God; had a grave or tomb exca- vated in a rock in the avenue in front of hi; residence, in which he expressed a desire to be. buried in an up right position and on one occasion he had been saved with difficulty from being torn to pieces by one of his bulls, and when asked why he had exposed himself to this peril, his reply was, "Do you think I am going to be put out of ray own field by my own bull ?" The undue influence and fraud relied on were alleged to have been practised chiefly by the Rev. William Lyster, of Killucan, who was on inti- mate terms with the deceased, who was closely associated with him in the making of the will, and of the numerous wills which had preceded it—for Mr. Adolphus Cookehadrepeatedlychanged theobject of his testamentary intentions—>-and who, t was con- tended, was actuated by motives of dislike for the Pur- dons, who had in various ways offended him, and in relation to whom he was sworn to have uttered threats that the property should not go to them. The testator in his frequent changes as to the objects of his bounty was, it was alleged by the plaintiff, actuated by a desire that his property should go to"a good landlord," and his selection of Lord Longford's son was due to his admiration of the way in which Lord Longford's own estate was managed. The jury had found a verdict by which the will was declared void, on the ground of undue influence; Judge Warren had granted a new trial on the ground of his own misdirec tion, and (chiefly) on the further ground that the verdict was against the evidence and the weight of evidence. The appeal from his lordship's decision has been at hearing for the last four days in her Majesty's Court of Appeal, before the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Chief Justice, the Lord Chief Baron, and Lord Justice Deasy. Mr. McDonough'e opening speech for the appellants having closed, a consultation took place, which resulted in a compro- misel the terms of whieh, it is understood, are that the estate shall be sold; that one half of the proceeds of the sale shall go to the plaintiff, aid the other half to the defendants. The- estate will probabli realise £ 120,000. To give effect to this compromise e hill will her promoted in Parliament in t^f pi^nl session. í i

: A FRENCH MARRIAGE, AND WHA3…

[No title]

IA FORGOTTEN HERO.

[No title]

THE FRENCH ARTILLERY. j

LORD ROSSLYN'S INTERVIEW WITH…

[No title]

THE NORTH UNST LIGHTHOUSE.

TEN DEARS' EXPLORATION.

[No title]

-::.. WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

[No title]

I FOREIGN AND COLONIAL.

[No title]