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/ ■ LONDON CORRESPONDENCE.

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THE TERRIBLE RAILWAY DISASTER…

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THE WAR.

-n , WAR ITEMS.

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REVIEW OF THE CORN TRADE.

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REVIEW OF THE CORN TRADE. (From "BelTs Weekly Messenger?) As regards the wheat trade, in view of th& crisif through which we are passing, it is natural that a ,firmer tone should be apparent, as war with Russia would mean that a very important portion of out supplies would be cut off. Holders were, therefore justified in holding out for higher terms, and onFridaf an advance of Is. to 2s. per qr. was obtained. There was, however, no activity in the trade. Millers were as re- luctant to buy as holders were to sell, and hence very little produce changed hands. The statistical position is still in favour of firm markets. In spite of a large importation this season, the consumption of foreign produce has been so great that the accumulation of grain at our outports has been trifling, but the strong hopes of peace which are held out, or rather which the public entertain, are favourable to the pursuance of a cautieus policy. On the Continent, the trade for cereal produce has been quiet during the week; but the supplies offering have been very moderate, and the political future un- certain. There has been some reluctance shown to sell. Good wheat and barley are both scarce, but good deal of inferior produce is offering at irregular prices. At New York the political news which has excited this country has been received with calmness, the value of wheat and flour having slightly declined. 10 the United States a belief in an early termination to the war is evidently entertained, but it is also reported o* authority, that the supplies of produce in existence are still very large. Choice barley has continued very scarce, and late prices have been fully supported. Medium qualities however, have sold slowly at about previous currencies* For grinding barley the trade has been quiet, but prices have ruled firm. Malt, of good and fine quality» has continued to realise extreme rntcs, but for inferior descriptions the trade is slow, without material change in the quotations. Rather more firmness has been apparent in the trader for oats; but the improvement established in price* has been very trifling. The supplies offering have been very moderate. A firmer tone has also pervaded the market for Indian corn, and the quotation has improved to the extent of 3d. to 6d per qr. Rather a firmer feeling has cbaracterised the trade !J for flour, and, although no distinct change has taken-, place, the tendency has been upwards.

THE BRITISH FLEET.

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