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,¡ THE ALLEGED HOTEL FRAUDS.

COSTUME BALL IN A LUNATIC…

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ATTEMPTED MURDER AND ROBBERY.

THE TELEPHONE.

ON THE DIZZY BRINK.

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THE COMMERCIAL DEPRESSION.…

THE GROWTH OF WEALTH.

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A ROMANTIC MARRIAGE.'I

CHARGE OF ABDUCTION..

CO-OPERATIVE SANITATION.

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A TRIUMPH OF MEDICAID SKlr

FUNERAL OF KING VICTOR EMMANUEL.

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FUNERAL OF KING VICTOR EMMANUEL. The funeral convoy of the late King of Italy left the Quirinal at ten o'clock on the 17th. The route followed was by the Quattre Fontane, Piazza Bar berini, Via Tritone, Due Macelli, Piazza Spagna, Via Babuino, Piazza del: Pepolo, and the Corso, to the Piazza Sciarra, Via Lata, Collegio Romano, Pie di Marmo, Piazza Minerva, Via Minerva, and the Pantheon. The sky was overcast and the weather damp and chilly, but there was no rain. Many people who came by the late train on the previous night found no lodg- ings and had to await morning in the streets. At early dawn masses of the population were pouring down from all the streets towards the centre, and ranging themselves along the line of the procession. The people were admirably behaved, their look and bearing betokening great earnestness. There were about 160,000 strangers, and 30,000 troops of all arms lined., the whole route of the procession. The appearance and behaviour of the troops were admirable. The convoy consisted of Cavalry, Artillery, Infantry, Engineers, Bersaglieri, Marinesj an Alpine battaIibn,;theMilitaryandNavaI Schools, Gendarmerie, apprentices, bands, and a numerous staff of all ranks and arms. The Schools and Academies of Rome and Turin, Corporations, the officials of the various Ministries and the Royal Household, the Prefect of Rome Army and Navy commanders, Magistrates and Knightlv Orders, the High Courts of Justice and Ex- chequer, the Supreme Court, the Council of State, Deputies, Senators, trumpeters, Clergy (the latter not numerous), great Officers of State, Heads of Embassies, and Special Envoys of Foreign Princes also took part in it General Medici, First Aide- de-Camp, bore the King's sword. Right and left of the hearse were the State Ministers, the Presidents of the Senate and Chamber, and the Knights of the Annunziate. The Hundred Guards, not mounted, formed an escort on both sides. The Iron Crown of Italy from Monza Cathedral was borne on a velvet cushion. The King's war-horse was in mourning trappings. Municipalities, deputations, Trades Unions, Cavalry, and an immense mass of people constituted the procession, which lasted nearly two hours. The city was all hung with mourning flags and draperies. The Pantheon was ornamented with stately elegance inside and out. In the centre, under the skylights roofed with glass and iron, was the grand scaffold, with twenty-four candelabra and burning tapers on four great altars, and four colossal lions made from as many cannon trophies, presented by the Due Roche- foucault to the Pope. The booming of the minute guns, mingled with the'lofty and impressive strains of a newly-compesed funeral march, altogether formed an imposing and deeolv »«««««» wrflmnnv. THE NRW KING TAKING THE OATE. t lu turday the new King of Italy, Humbert I., uJif TT oakk to Constitutioh in the presence of both Houses of the Italian Parliament. A correspon- dent, describing the scene in a special telegram, says that outside the Chamber his Majesty was received with deafening shouts, and that, upon entering, tt °feri,ng lasted several minutes. King I Humbert then swore fidelity to the Consti- tution, and had barely finished the last words or tne oath when the cheering was renewed. He afterwards signed three records of the act, which will be prqserved in the State archives. Each member of both Houses in turn took the oath, and then his Majes y made a short speech, in which he said he had been taught by his father that the surest safeguard against eyery danger was the religious observance of free institutions. That was the creed of his House, and it would be his strength. He coveted no higher ofhisfather" haVe ifc"8aid of him' "He was worthj

CARDINAL MANNING AND THE „…

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TWO SENTENCES OF DEATH.]

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THE MAT%0NIAL MARKET IN PARIS.

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LIFE ON A GREAT CHINESE RIVER.

MURDEROUS BRAWL IN A PUBLIC-I…

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