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,¡ THE ALLEGED HOTEL FRAUDS.

COSTUME BALL IN A LUNATIC…

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ATTEMPTED MURDER AND ROBBERY.

THE TELEPHONE.

ON THE DIZZY BRINK.

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THE COMMERCIAL DEPRESSION.…

THE GROWTH OF WEALTH.

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THE GROWTH OF WEALTH. At a meeting of the Statistical Society, in their rooms at King's College, Strand, London, a paper on The Recent Accumulations of Capital in the United Kingdom was read by Mr. Robert Giffen, in which he stated that his object was to bring forward certain well-known data, which would justify some broad conclusions. It was evident that the growth of capital in the United Kingdom had been very rapid. If they looked at the income-tax returns, they perceived that the gross income assessed rose in Great Britain from J115,000,000 at the beginning of the century to £ 130,000,000 in 1815; £251,000,000 in 1843; and £ 262,000,000 in 1853; and then in the United King- dom from .£308,000,000 in 1855 to £396,000,000 in 1865, and .£571,000,000 in 1875. If the capital of that portion of the income derived from capital had only progressed at the same rate, the annual increase of capital all through, and especially of late years, must have been enormous. The increase in the in- come assessed between 1865 and 1875 amounted to .£175,000,000, which was equal to 44 per cent. of the income assessed in 1865. Leaving out altogether the capital not yielding income, and dealing only with the capital yielding income, a similar increase of capital would give for 1865 a total capital of about X6,200,000,000, on which the increase at 14 per cent. would be X2,288,000,000, or in round figures, .£230,000,000 per annum. That growth, as compared with the growth of former periods, showed that the increase of late years bad been much more rapid than at any previous period of the century. What (he asked) was the hearing of the facts brought out on the degree of improvement in the material welfare of the community in consequence of the accumulations of capital and the addition to the margin of taxation ? It was evident that the im- provement in both respects must be great. Since 1855, at least, the addition to the capital of the community had been immensely greater in proportion than the increase in its numbers. The increase in population had been about one per cent. per annum, but property had increased three to feur oer eent. and upwards. As to the margin of taxation, the figures were absolutely astounding. The apparent increase of capital between 1865 and 1875 alone was £2,400,000,000 sterling—about three times the amount of the National Debt. The com- munity had thus acquired in ten years three times the amount of its debt. It could pay the debt three times over, and still be as rich as at the beginning of the decade. Allowing that to keep things in equili- brium there ought to be an increase of capital pari passu with the increase of population, the increase of capital in the ten years (1865-75), merely to keep the commanitj as rich as it was, would only have been a little over £ 600,000,000. Deducting that from the .62,400,000 000 of actual increase, there was still a sum of £1,800,000.000, or two and a-balf times the National Debt, which the nation could afford to pay, and still be as rich individually as it was ten years ago. After alluding to the distribu- tion of this vast increase of wealth, the reader re- marked that a great deal was said at the present moment which was substantially to the effect that workmen and capitalists were paralysed but, looking at the matter scientifically, and from a point outside as it were, he said that the balance of probability must held to be that the higgling of the market, as had always happened before, would result in a working compromise, and that industry would be resumed and go on after much individual losses, but without in the aggregate any loss or destruction of capital. It was said again that our coal and iron would soon be exhausted, and that our whole position was based on cheap coal and iron; but in reply it might be observed that a few years' industry would replace the capital value, and a Hour other capital would remain. Looking at our cap. tal as a whole, he thought it was a strong thing to say that because many years hence we should not possess, as a nation, a certain particular form of capital, therefore the other forms of capital would not remain to be used and enjoyed. Against all considerations of that nature we might, perhaps, set the continual progress in invention which was being made, and which seemed to benefit most the nations with accumulated capital. It would be the fault of the Bnglish people if their progress was not in future even more rapid than it had been in the past.

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A ROMANTIC MARRIAGE.'I

CHARGE OF ABDUCTION..

CO-OPERATIVE SANITATION.

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A TRIUMPH OF MEDICAID SKlr

FUNERAL OF KING VICTOR EMMANUEL.

CARDINAL MANNING AND THE „…

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TWO SENTENCES OF DEATH.]

FENCES IN THE FORGED LEASES…

THE MAT%0NIAL MARKET IN PARIS.

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LIFE ON A GREAT CHINESE RIVER.

MURDEROUS BRAWL IN A PUBLIC-I…

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