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-----OUR GARDENING. NOTES.…

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OUR GARDENING. NOTES. p [See Work on Vegetables and Flowers by Messrs. Sutton Sons, Heading.) AUGUST. The work of this month is not severe, but a few of its details are of great consequence. The matter of chief importance is T^-SEE thatRvhat- ever should be DONERS well, DOIW^ becauise the winter is coming, and the weak JOINTS^ in the harness may be made manifest when it is too late to repair them. The supplies of the garden during the next winter and spring will in great Eart depend upon good management now, for we ave to make the utmost of the few week of grow- ing weather that remain. Autumn, sowings of seeds must not only be, attended to, but with par- ticular care, to insure a regular and rapid growth, and yet not a single seed should be sown a day too soon, because if the plants attain too large a size before winter they may be destroyed by frost. One great difficulty in sowing seed now is the likelihood of the ground,-bein|g too dry; yet it is most unwise to water seeds, and it is al- ways better if they can be got up with the natural moisture of the soil alone. However, in an ex- treme case the ground should be well soaked be- fore the seed is sown, and after sowing covered with hurdles, pea-sticks, or mats until the seed begins to sprout. ARTICHOKES, GLOBE, to be cut down as soon as the beads are used. BROCCILI to be planted out. As the sprouting broccoli, which belongs to the class of "Winter Greens," does not pay well in spring unless it grows freely now, plant it far enough apart, or if crowded where already planted to stand the winter, take out every alternate plant and make another plantation. BRUSSELS SPROUTS may be sown early in the month, part to stand the winter in the seed-bag, and pa/t to be pricked out ready for planting in the spring. This plan 'insures a fine plant and an early supply of buttons. CABBAGE to be sown in small quantities, the large sorts being suitable to sow now. Plant coleworts without delay, and clean up plots from which cabbages have been cut. CARDOONS. -Commence blanching if the plants are ready. CAULIFLOWER must be sown to stand the win- ter, and there is no better place for them than a sheltered spot on an open sunny border. The time to sow must be determined by the climate of the district. In cold, late localities, the, nrst week is none too early; from the 15th to the 25th is a good time for all the midland districts, and the end of the month (or the first week of Sep- tember) is early enough in the extreme south. In Devon and Cornwall the sewing is later still. In any case, the seed should be sown on a good bed, and with care, in order that a healthy growth may be promoted from the first. It is important to have the plants as hardy as possible by free exposure, and, therefore, they must not be sheltered or shaded until frost threatens them, and then the glasses must be put on, but they must have air at every opportunity. CELERY to be carefully earthed up as required. It takes quite five weeks to blanch celery well, and as the earthing up checks its growth, the operation should not be commenced a day too soon. Take care the earth does not get into the hearts. CORX SALAD should be sown during this month or September to produce plants fit for use in early spring. In the summer months the whole plant is edible, but in the winter or spring the outer leaves only should be used. CUCUMBER. For a supply of cucumbers during the winter months the gene- ral principles of management are iden- tical with those given under January and March, with one important exception. At the commencement of the year the cultivator may rely on a continued accession of light and warmth to aid its efforts. Now, he must anticipate a constant diminution of these vital forces. Hence the progress of the plants will gradually abate as the year wanes, and due allowance must be made for the fact. So much will depend on the character of the autumn and winter, that it will be unwise to risk all on a single sowing. Seed put in on two or three occasions between the end of August and the end of October will provide plants in various stages of growth to meet the contingencies of the season. The production of cucumbers will then depend on care and manage- ment. In very dull cold weather it may be dangerous to syringe the foliage, but the neces- sary moisture can be secured by sprinkling the floor and walls. ENDIvE.-Make a final sowing, and plant out all that are large enough, selecting, if possible, a dry sloping bank for the purpose. LETTUCE to be sown to stand the winter, the hardiest sorts, such as black-seeded Bath com- panies and winter while companies, being the best. In cold districts the middle of the month is a good time to sow in favoured places the end of the month will be better. ONIONS are things to be re-considered. For many years the tripoli section enjoyed pre- eminence for sowing at this season, the opinion prevailing that other kinds were unsuitable. But it is found that Sutton's Improved Reading, and others that may with propriety be described as English onions, are as hardy as the tripolis, and, therefore, as well adapted for sowing at this season. Thus, instead of sorts that must be used quickly we may commend for summer sowing the best of the keepers, and the result will be heavier crops and earlier ripening, with plentiful supplies of "things" for salads all through the summer and winter. Two sowingsâone at the beginning, the other at the end of the month- may be adopted with advantage. The storage of onions is often faulty, and consequently losses occur through mildew and premature growth. If any are as yet unripe, spread them out in the sun in a dry place, where they can be covered quickly in case of rain. In wet cold seasons it is sometimes necessary to finish the store onions by putting them in a nearly cold oven for some hours before they are stored away. PEA.-It is mere waste of seed to sow now, but crops coming forward for late bearing should have attention, more especially to make them safe against storms by a sufficiency of support, and in case of drought to give abundance of water. STRAWBERRY PLANTS may be put in should the weather prove favourable, but next month will answer. In bearing weather it is well worthwhile to bed the plants closely in a moist shady place until rain comes, and then plant ojt. TOMATOES to be gathered as soon as ripe. If bad weather interferes with the finishing of the crop, cut the full-grown fruit with a length of seem attached, and hang them up in a sunny green- house, or some other warm spot in full daylight. TURNIP may be sown in the early part of the month. The best sorts now are Jersey Navet, or Snowball. All the Year Round will please chose who like a yellow turnip.

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