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I ST. ASAPH PETTY SESSIONS.

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Family Notices

FUNERAL OF MR. W. M. THACKERAY.I

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FUNERAL OF MR. W. M. THACKERAY. I From the Express. I On Wednesday morning the mortal remains of Mr W. M. Thackeray were interred in the Ke isal-green cemetery, the resting place of m my who have ssrved this generation by their genius, their character, or their unselfish industry. The funeral procession left the private residence of the deceased, at Kensington, shortly before eleven o'clock, and arrived at the cemetery about noon. There was but one mourning coach, and in this and the suc- ceeding carriage, which was the private one of the de- ceased, were seated the Rev. F. St. John Thackeray Mr James Rodd, cousins of the deceased Capt. Shaw, his brother-in.law and the Hon. E. Curzon. Tiie re- maining carriages were those of Mr Martin Thackeray, General Low, Lord Gard ner, Sir W. Frazer, Hon. E. Curzon, Earl Granville, Mr Macaulay, Q.C., Sir James Colville, and Messrs. Bradbury and Evaus. The funeral service read in a solemn and impressive manner, by the chaplain of the cemetery, the Rev Chas. Stuart. When the coffin was placed in the little chapel of the burial ground a strong desire w.a manifested by nearly every one to enter the building but the space inside was soon occupied, as far as it could be conveni- ently, and the pervading reverence for the departed was quite sufficient to prevent any unseemly pressure. After the conclusion of the nrst portion of the service, the mass of those present proceeded to the grave, which is in a quiet spot on the left side of the cemetery, and not fai from the entrance gate. In looking round, men were to be seen on every side whose writings constitute the mental food of our people, the muscle and the flesh of our literature; writers whose books go wherever the Englishman treads, whose por- traits are hung up in the hut of the early settler in a newly .discovered tract of a distant colony, as m the me- chanics' institute of a provincial town. Instinctively the presence of the great English humorist, whose ge- nius was ever touchingly and gracefully acknowledged by the author whose burial was celebrated on Wednes- day, was felt to be assured. Mr Dickins was naturally present at the solemnity. Some who were aware of tue long-established friendship between the deceased and the author of Sartor Resartus" looked for him too in the group, but Mr Carlyle dislikes crowds and is all but a septuagenarian, and he was not recognised among the spectators. The number present amounted to nearly a thousand. The scene at the grave both during and after the eel e- mony of interment was extremely affecting. The silence was profound, and every countenance bespoke a deep sense of the loss which the nation as well as individuals have sustained. When the service had terminated, the Misses Thackeray, the two daughters of the deceased, who had formed no part of the procession, but who broke through the conventionality which excludes from such scenes those who are the deepest sufferers, and were in the chapel, approached the open grave anLI looked into it with a grief which was touching to behold. After they had withdrawn, other relatives advanced for the same purpose' and these again were followed by the immediate friends, and successively by almost everybody present. The coffin which was exceedingly plain, bore upon it the following inscription: William Makepeace Thackeray, Esq., died 24th December, 1863, aged 52 y cart.

THE GOOD OLD TOWN,

IRHOS-DDU BURIAL GROUND.

I CHRISTMAS EVE.—SLR \L.lfi...u:"…

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WANT OF ECONOMY IN THE COUNCIL.

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SHAKESPEARE TERCENTENARY.

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