I REVOLTING ATTACKS ON LADIES IN A RAIL WAY TRAIN.|1864-01-02|Wrexham and Denbighshire Advertiser and Cheshire Shropshire and North Wales Register - Welsh Newspapers Online
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I REVOLTING ATTACKS ON LADIES…

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I REVOLTING ATTACKS ON LADIES IN A RAIL WAY TRAIN. At Marylebone Police Court, on Tuesday, a tall powerful, well-dressed man, named William Whitehead, aged 36, and who gave the address Wexham Rectory, Buckinghamshire, gentleman," was brought up by Mr Durdle, superintendent of the Great Western Railway Company's police, charged with indecently assaulting Charlotte Richardson, in a carriage on the Great Wes. tern Railway, between Langley and West Drayton and Paddington. he (prisoner) being drunk at the time. The prisoner when placed at the bar did not seem to have sufficiently recovered from his drunken bouts of the previous day. Mrs Richardson, a married lady, resiaing at 7 Hope- terrace, Notting-hill, slud-Myself and my sister-in-law started from Slough by the 20 minutes past seven o'clock train to come to London. A third lady got into the carriage with me. When we stopped at Langley the prisoner and another man, whom I now see at the back of the court, got into the carriage where we were. They were both very much intoxicated, and the man not in custody was so drunk that he had to crawl into the car- riage on his hands and knees. Directly the train started the prisoner waived his stick about in a most threaten- ing manner over our heads, and I was very much frigh- tened The man who is now behind tried to stop him ourisbmg his stick, and the more he did so the more the prisoner called upon him to insult us. He (prison- er) caught hold of my legs and pulled me down, and called out, Now, then, half-a-sovereign—nothing less than half a sovereign." The ether man said, '-I don't want her; I would sooner have my own servant." I was terribly frightened. Fortunately our journey was not far from London; but I think if we had been in an express with the two men the three of us would have been torn to pieces. The prisoner used very indecent language. He put his hand upon my thigh, above my dress. I got out at West Drayton. Prisoner-What coloured gloves did I wear ? Prosecutrix I do not know, for I was so terrified by his flourishing- his stick and his language that I was afraid to look at him. He spoke to me whilst we were in the train, and ask me if I was going to Paddingten. Through fear I told him I was. There were five in all in the carriage. Prosecutrix added that when she got out of the train she spoke to the guard, and he placed her and the other ladies in another compartment. Fatniy Richardson, sister-in-law to last witness, gave corroborative evidence. Benjamin Denning, guard to the train from Windsor, said-I saw the prisoner and the man who now stands behind him in the body of the court get into the same compartment of the train which the ladies were in, at Langley. I did not notice anything amiss with them, or I would not have allowed them,to have gone. I was busy a'ir> other passengers. When I got to West Drayton the iirst witness got out of the carriage, in which she had been, crying, and said that herself, her friend, and another lady had been most grossly insulted by two men, and their conduct had been most unfamous. They asked me to place them in another compartment. I did so, and then went back to the compartment, in which the prisoners were, and told them that the three ladies who had just got out had lodged a complaint with me that thuy had been insulted by them- I told them if I heard of such conduct again I should take other means to stop it. After this other passengers got into the train, and we proceeded as far as Southhall, where the train stopped. Here he got out and said to me that himself and some females had been most grossly insult- ed, and threatened by the prisoner and his friend. He gave me his card, and said there was then a lady in the carriage in hysterics. I carried the lady out, and cleared the compartment of the other ladies, anl locked the prisoner and his friend in till we got to Paddington, where both the prisoner and the friend of his who stands behind now were given into custody. It was explained that the other mm was not in the dock because the prosecutrix had declined to proceed against him. Mr Knox remanded the prisoner for a week. The prisoner was then removed to the cells. Afterwards Mr Durdle applied for and got granted summonses against several, as he stated, important witnesses," and also against the prisoner's friend for being drunk in one of their carriages. This last appli- cation was under the company's by-laws. It was granted.

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