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I REVOLTING ATTACKS ON LADIES…

COLLIERY EXPLOSION AT MAESTEG.…

I NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PUDDLERS.…

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I THE HEAVY GALES OF THE 2ND…

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I THE HEAVY GALES OF THE 2ND AND 3BD j DECEMBER, 1863. At no recent period have the disastrous effects of storms been more severely experienced thin during the hurricane ot the 2nd and 3rd December last. Its results were felt, more or less, in all parts of the country. About 11 a.m. on the 3rd, the anemoneter at the Royal Exchange, London, registered a pressure of 30lbs. to the square foot. During the gales of October last, a similar instrument at Greenwich registered 291 lbs., whilst the one at the Royal Exchange only showed a pressure of 18 lbs. But in order to realize, comparatively, the destruc- tive character of the storm, we must turn our attention to the coasts of the British Isles, where it blew with un- exampled fury for forty-eight hours; and where it con- signed to the deep many a goodly ship and her crew, causing destruction of property and loss of life to a truly appaling extent. It is not our purpose to harrow up the feelings of the reader; nor is it our intention to dwell on the sad scenes of desolation, of bereaved women and children rendered widows and orphans by this truly calamitous visitation of the storm of the 2nd and 3rd of December. We shall, therefore, only remind the reader of the few simple statements of the services of the life-boats during the recent gales, as they reached the National Life-boat Institution from its honorary secretaries on the coast, feeling assured that those facts have appealed with irre- sistible force to the sence of duty on the part of many of our countrymen who have hitherto withheld from the Life-boat cause their support. It is supposed that upwards of two hundred and fifty vessels were wrecked during these two disasterous days, and that the loss of life was proportionately great, It is, however, very gratifying to find that, owing to the gallant and persevering exertions of the crews of the life-boats, two hundred and forty-six persons" were happily snatched, under God, from the numerous ship- wrecks on various parts of our coast. The life-boat is but a little vessel to contend with a cauldron of sea on a stormy night, like that which was recently experienced at Hoiyhead and Bude Haven, bat her rowers are stalwart, weather-beaten men, whose sacred object is to preserve human life, and who im- peril their own in that noble enterprise. The thiag is altogether characteristic of our countryâthe build of the life-boat, her hardy crew, and her system of maintenance by voluntary contributions. Well may foreigners shipwrecked on our coast re- capitulate, on their return home, the great efforts made on the shores of the United Kingdom to succour them in the hour of their deep distress and well may Eng- lishmen in all parts of the world testify their high ap- reciation and thankfulness for the exiiiteikee amongst us of an Institution simply and grandly designed for the preservation of life from shipwreck, as its founders forty years ago described it. The Institution, we feel assured, does possess, and cannot fail to possess, the sympathies of the public, as long as it can publish re- cords of deeds so valiant as those that marked the ser- vices of its life-boats on the 2nd and 3rd of Dec. list. We may add that during the year which has just closed 378 lives have been saved by the boats of the National Life-boat Institution. When we remember that every life saved by life-boats has been rescued under perilous circumstances, it will at once be seen what great benefit has been conferred by the Life-boat Institution, not omly on the poor men themselves, but also on their wives and children who would otherwise be widows and orphans. Again, 301 lives have been rescued in the same period by shore boats, to the crews of which the Insti- tution has granted rewards. Thus making a total of 679 persons saved from Ship- wreck during the year, through the instrumentality of this great and valuable Institution. Since the beginning of the (1863), the Institution has also expended about 213,000 on its various life-boat establishments, on the coasts of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The number of lives saved either hy the life-boats of the Society, or by special exertions, for which it has granted rewards since its formation, is 13,330. How inadequately can words express the aggregate amount of misery which the saving of so many thousand of lives must have prevented. It can only have been fully appreciated by the parties themselves, and by their relatives and friends, whose expressions of gratitude for such important benefits are often of the most feeling character. Since the establishment of the Institution it has granted 82 Gold Medals, 733 Silver Medals, and £ 17,730 in cash, for saving life from shipwreck, in addition to Y,80,000 expended by the Society on its Life-boat Es- tablishments. We will only add, that contributions are received for the Life-boat Institution by all the London and Country Bankers, and by its Secretary, Mr Richard Lewis, at 14, John Street, Adelphi, London. THE LIFE-BOAT. Man the life-boat; man the life-boat! Hearts of oak, the tempest brave See, the shatter'd vessel staggers Round her, billows foam and rave. See the ark of refuge launching; See her hardy crew prepare For the dangerous work of mercy Gallant British hearts are there. Now the fragile boat is hanging On the bililow's feathery height; Now 'midst fearful depths descending, While we shudder at the sight. Courage; courage, she's in safety! See again her buoyant form, By His gracious hand uplifted Who controls the raging storm. With her precious cargo freighted, Now the life-boat nears the shore; Parents, brethren, friends embracing Those they thought to see no more. Blessings on the dauntless spirits, Dangers thus who nobly brave, Ocean's terrors, death defying, So they may a brother ilaye. Christian pause, and deeply ponder, Is there nothing you can do ? Sinking ship. and storm, and life-boat, Have they not a voice for you ? Canada, Oct., labJ. AN OLD SAILOR.

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■P I PICKINGS F- "PUNCH."

I?-?"0?? YORKSHIRE ?....TRÅTIO}!l:S.

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MURDER AND ATTEMPTED SUICIDE…

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