[No title]|1860-01-28|Wrexham and Denbighshire Advertiser and Cheshire Shropshire and North Wales Register - Welsh Newspapers Online
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t -......-:" -... MISCELLAIfEOTIS

I THE GREAT EASTERN. 1

FEARFUL CATASTROPHE AT ST.…

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MALA01 us INCIDENTAL TO TRADES AND EMPLOY- .XE-,TS.-f tle principal exciting causes of disease amongst the industrial population are -1. Sedentary confinement and insufficient ventilation, 2. Abrupt changes of temperature, to which all classes of artisans, and especi- ally brass and iron founders, glass blowers, bakers, and brewers, are exposed. 3. The inhalation of au atmos- phere impregnated with mineral, animal and vegeta- ble particles which irritate and often permanently in- flame the bronchial surface and the delicate substance of the lungs, and are productive of great suffering a- mongst dry-grinders and needle pointers; edge-tool, gun-barrel, and othtr grinders; metal filers, stone-cut- ters, miners, and quarners; pearl and horn button ma- kers flax-dressers, wool-carders, weavers, and featter dressers; corn-miliers sawyers and turners. The re- markable curative properties of l)r de Jongh's Light Brown Cod Liver Oil in cases of consumption, chronio bronchitis, asthma, rheumatism, and general debility, rationally account for its extraordinary efficacy in the various disorders connected with arts and employments. In those special diseases of the respiratory organs, so prevalent in the manufacturing and mining districts, Dr do Jongh's Cod Liver Oil has been used with the most strikingly beneficial results. A HORRIBLE AFFAia.-The Journal de Chartres re- lates the folio wing :Three mornings ago, a little girl ten years of age, was walking by the side of the road at Bonneval, she was suddenly attacked by an enormous mastiff, a stranger to the village, and before her father, who was near, could arrive, the dog throwing the child down, bit off her nose, and tore the flesh from her cheeks arms, and other parts of her person. Driven away by the man, the dog, a little further on, attacked a boy, and tore his face in a frightful manner. The auimal next at- tacked in succession several dogs and bit them severely. It then entered a wood near Vieuvicq, in which a wo- man was at work, and rushing on her threw her down and lacerated her dreadfully. The flesh was torn from different parts of her person, leaving the boneo bare, her scalp was dragged off, and her nose and cheek were eaten. A man having come up, the animal took to flight, but afterwards attacked. near Ailthon, a workinan, and bit him badly in the face and body. Next the dog entered. Authon, and rushing in succession on four children one the son of a physician named Perier, tore flesh from their faces and persons, and bit a woman and a servant girl. The whole population of the town was thrown into consternation; but as night set in, the dog disappeared. The next morning a number of persons armed with guns forks, and scythes, went in search of the animal, and having after a while found it, succeeded in shouting it dead. On examination it turned out that it was not mad, but had a long sharp nail driven into its nose, and the belief is that the pain which the nail occasioned rendered it furious. Of the ten persons attacked three are already dead, and some of the others are ao fearfully- injured that their recovery is not probable. Although the animal was not mad, the persons bitten have, by way of precaution, had their wounda cauterised, and the dogs bitten have been killed. OCTOOENABIANS IN THE PEERAGE.—Lord Sinclair is the oldest member of the peerage of the United King- dom, having been born in 1768; and which is strnug"r still, he has had the honour of the peerage for no less than 84 years-a period we believe without precedent. His lordship is no longer a member of the House of Peers, having ceased to hold a Scotch representative peerage at the late general election. The oldest members of the House of Lords at this moment are-Lord Lvnd- hurst and the Earls ot Stair and Guildford, who were born in 1772 next follow the .Archbishop of Armagh and Lord Combermere, born in 1773: Lords Gormanston and Reay, and the Earls of Charlsmont and Dun- donald, born in 1775; the Earl of Onslow, and the Bishop of Exeter and Viscount Southwell, born in 1777, the Earls of Beverley and Manvers, and Lords Droug- ham and Arbuthnott, born in 1778 and the Earls of Stafford and Radnor, and Lords Gough and Seaton, born in 1779. MR. nlUGHT AND THE REFORM QUESTION.—There is no pleasing those who make a trade of writing at Mr Mr Blight. Like the soldier under the lash who was equally dissatisfied whether the drummer flogged high or low, they abuse him in unmeasured terms when he declares himself desirous of a full measure of Reform, and they taunt him when lie professes himself wiliin'<* to support a moderate instalment rather than have the question deferred to an indefinite day. If he exposes me political wrongs under which the vast majority of grown-up men labour, they cry out that he is an incen- diary, attempting to eet class against class, and bring about an English edition of the .French Revolution, or introduco an Americanised form of government. Let him endeavour to allay tbe groundless turmoil, and they I turn round and accuse him of deserting his principles. They are almost disappointed that there is no turbulence no rioting, no seditious assemblage, no inflammatory or- atory, but they console themselves by lifting up their voices and asserting that thero is no real desire for Re. form at all. If so, why this waste of energy in deny- ing that which is non-existent? The truth is that the very quietude and absence of excitement with which tho great object is pursued are the very causes which terrify the opponents of Reform most. They would infinitely prefer a noisy, dashing charge of cavalry, to the sight of the heavy guns being slowly but surely brought into I pc)siii)n, and the harrassing dread that a mine is being dug beneath their outworks that may explode at any moment and hurl them into the air.-Birmi)ighatn Daily Post. SERFDOM iiq RUSSIA.—A St. Petersburg letter says "A serf in the government of Tambow recently killed his lord for having seduced his (the serfs) affianced bride. For this act of vengeance the serf will probably be condemned to hard labour in the mines. Tho late Emperor, on one occasion, gave a very different decision. The child of a serf having struck a dog, belonging to the lord, the latter set his whole pack upon the boy, who was torn to pieces. The child's father upon this killed the noble on the spot. The Emperor decreed, A dog for a dog,' and added, I should have done as mucli.3 The serf was merely detained a short time in a monas- tery.E, xprcss. Among the hostile parties now contending in Africa there are three Sabbaths celebrated in each week. The Sabbath of the Moors is on Friday, the Sabbath of the very few Jews who fight in their ranks, as irregulars or settlers in the country, for their hearths and homes, is on Saturday; while the Sabbath ot the Roman catholic Spaniards is, like our own, on Sunday. Woodcocks (says the Hereford Journal) arc extreme- ly scarce this season, and the scarcity is accounted for by the fact that hundreds of thousands of these birds were drowned during their emigration towards these shores on the night of the teriffic gale in which the Roy- al Charter was lost. The Daily News says Count Cavour has already given proofs of the vigour which is return to power gives the Piedmontese government. His Cabinet was no sooner fcrrned than he took measures for bring- ing the constitution again into force. He has dissolved the parliament, in order to the election of another, which will include the deputies of Lombardy. Sir Tatton Sykes, Baronet, of Sledmere, is endeavour- ing to raise a corps of mounted rilfes. Mr Henry Parv ker, of Sledmere Castle, Sir Tatton's agent, is instructed to communicate with the gentry and tenantry of the Wold district. The proposal hitherto has been well re- ceived. The Times says the trade of the Scotch lawyers in getting English bankrupts quiety out of all their diffi- culties is still said to be increasing, and remarks that so long as the system is tolerated it will scarcely bo necessary for the government to trouble themselves by proposing any measures of bankruptcy reform in this country. In Ulster, a clergyman has been refused access to the bedside of a dying man, a lodger, who had lived a Protestant, by his landlord, who said that the man had turned Roman Catholic and had been visited by the priest. An inquest was held in Whitechapel. London, on Mon- day evening, on the body of a child aged three weeks which 41 Died from inflamation of the left lung and pleura, accelerated by exposure and desertion of the mother in the public streets." Charles Morris, 23, a card-sharper, skittle-sharper, thimble-rigger, associate of most notorious thieves, and a returned convict, for stealing :£20. the property of Henry Hill, was at the Middlesex sessions, on Monday, sen- tenced to ten years's penal servitude. Upwards of f,1600 has been subscribed towards the proposed memorial to the late Mr Brunnel, but this is scarcely sufficient to accomplish the design of the promo- j teIII of the memory

J PJSRPRI(T YEWI-I. )

SHERIFFS FOR ENGLAND AND WALES…

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