Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

t -......-:" -... MISCELLAIfEOTIS

I THE GREAT EASTERN. 1

FEARFUL CATASTROPHE AT ST.…

News
Cite
Share

FEARFUL CATASTROPHE AT ST. LAWRENCE â 200 PERSONS KILLED. The papers of the 11th instant contain details of a shocking catastrophe, which occurred at Lawrence, Mass, on the 10th. The following details are from the Ameri- can papers -Lawrence Mass, Tuesday, January 10th, 9 p.m.,âOne of the most terrible catastrophes on Ieeord occurred in this city this afternoon. The Pembcrton Mills fell with a sudden crash about five o'clook, while some six or seven hundred operatives were at work. The mills ate a complete wreck. Some two or three hun- dred persons are supposed to be still in the ruins. At present it is impossible to give anything like a correct statement of the loss of lite, but from the best authority it is believed that at least two hundred are dead in the ruins. Eighteen dead bodies have been already taken out, together with some persons mortally wounded, be- sides some fifty in different stages of nutilation. Mr Chase the manager ot the mills, and Mr Howe, the trea- surer, escaped by running from the falling building. It is impossible, as yet, to tell the cause-of the disaster. Our reporter has just come from the ruins, and the scenes there beggar all description. Some two or three more acres of ground are piled up with every description of machinery and the Mien building. Huge bonfires are burning to light some two or three thousand persons, who are working as if for their own lives, to res- cue th unfortunate persons, many of whom are still crying and begging to be released from their tortures. Every few minutes some poor wretch is dragged from his or her prison, and it is heartrending to hear their cries as they are drawn out with legs and arms crushed or torn, One man, shockingly mangled and partly un- der the bricks, deliberately cut his own throat to end his agony. The whole city seems in mourning. Many are running through the streets, and, with frantic cries, searching the rums. Temporary hospitals have been ar- ranged for those rescued. Many stand by the wreck frigid with despair. Often a terrible crash, caused by the clearing away, threatens death to those who may still be alive in the ruins. General K. H, Oliver is conspicuous and active in directing those persons who are endeavouring to rescue the victims of the disaster Gangs of men with ropes below are constantly dragging out huge pieces of the wreck which imprison so many. Some of the rescuers are killed in their humane efforts. Since we left the scene of the disaster, reports of more of the dead are constantly coming to us. Surgeons are coming in from all directions, and everything that can be done, at such a painful moment, is being done for the suffering victims of the feaiful calamity, the mystery of which will have to be cleared up by an inquest. I ADDITIONAL PARTICULAHS. I At aoout ten minutes to five o'clock this afternoon our citizens were atarmod.by the cry ef fire, which pro- ceeded from the Pemberton Mille, about four-fifths of which had fallen, a shapleas mass, without the slightest warning to the nearly bOO human beings who were then at work. The building was never considered to be as staunch tas it ought to have been. It ifM built about seven years since, and was then thought a sham. In- deed, before the machinery was put in the walls spread to such a degree that some 22 tons of iron plites were put in to save it from falling by its own weight. From the best information that can be now gathered, the building appeared to crumble and fall from-the eastern corner, or ends towird the Duck Mill. It fell inwards, as if powerfully drawn that away. Tie fire companies at once repaired to the spot, but there being no lire, tbey immediately set to work with a will to remove the rubbish. They very soon reached some of the rooms, and the dead and waun'ltd were ta-en out as fast as they could be reached. The City Hall has been convited into a temporary hospit- al for the dead and wounded, to remain there until re- cognised by their f.itnd", although scores were recognis- ed and taken at OMCO to their homes. Mr Palmer \S doe.ily buried in tho ruins at the time, and thinking there was 1,0 prospect of being exlri,ait I cut. his throat !o end hii suffering?. S'ill he was NX'rioate^, and lived for s jme time on arri ving at the hall. Ouu \v o;iian in that put I of tho mill still standing became affrighted, threw her bonnet and shawl out of a tifth story door and jumped o it lit-raelf, LreaLing her arm and irj uring herself so that she cannot recover, The labouring (ores of the mill Aai about 960, and it is supposed that about 700 hiimin he. iogs were actually buried in tho ruins. A woman has j'lst rescued, who says that there are fome 25 more in the vicinity of her yet alive. About half-past nine o'cloek fire was discovered. This additional horror although somewhat apprehended, struck terror to the hearts that had before been hopeful of saving more lives. Still the work of removal went briskly on. The force pumps aod all the engines which were on the ground at once got streams of water on, and have been pouling- on torrentsâso that now (1130 p m.), although volumes ot smoke and steam are rising, yet the fire does not seem to gain, and it is certainly to be hoped that it has been stayei. Those near at tile breaking out of ftUe fire were almost at the point of extricating a woman not b-idly hutt, but the flames drove them back, and the woman is supposed to have perished when de.ivery seem- ed so near. Calamity succeed s calamity, In ten min- utes the whole mass of rums has become one sheet of flame. The screams and moanings of the po buried creatures can be distinctly heard, but no power can save them. The flames threaten the destruction of the W Jhh to:1 mills und the bridge over the river.-Aineri- can Foper.

[No title]

J PJSRPRI(T YEWI-I. )

SHERIFFS FOR ENGLAND AND WALES…

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

I - ULAhK-

[No title]