Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

t -......-:" -... MISCELLAIfEOTIS

News
Cite
Share

t MISCELLAIfEOTIS FJJIOHTFUL PIT ACCIDENT. SEVEN PERSONS RILLED. âAbout six o'clock on Saturday mcrning, a frightful accident took place at No 15 pit, at the New Cross Col- liery, A eoneafield Heath, near Wolverhampton, in which seven personsâfour men and three boysâperished to- gether- The pit is an ironstone one, and two engines are connected with it, one of which is. employed night anu day in bringing up and lowering the miners, and in bringing up minerals. During thu night both engines are use d in the drainage, the druirl of the mineral cn- gine being thrown out of gear for that purpose, and j e- laced eac'.i morning by the night engineer on giving up his charg) to the man who works the engine on the day shift. On Saturday morning the muM engineer had just been relioved, and the first lot of miners wore beirst; low- ered-f.ur m"n, John Leech, Emmanuel Giles, Thomas Kelly, Bnfi Henry I-eirv nud three boys, John Jones, George Jones, and Samuel Slych. They wrnt down the first 34 yards safpiy, when the drum puddrii nly went out of gearing, and the cage in "Lil"h the men, freed from all check of machinery, fell to the bottom of the sum; h, or well in which the drainage of the shaft is o..Uectvd, breaking thiough the stout pUnluug which form the fencing of the mimph. An immediate ahrro W:, a raised and the miners were collected from all pnrts of the works but it was fully four hours before the bodies could be to. covered, on account of the difficulty thit was experienced in raising the cage and the wire rope attached to it. Ali the bodies were found in the sumph, in which there is a considerable depth of water. The night engineer, Thcmas Feredav, and the day engine r, William John- son, having bc-t n taken into cus>t:>dy,j>,m{ will be de .aiued until after the inquest. THE ARCH Bishop OF PARIS AND TIIE PAPAL QUES- TION.âWe (Evening Herald) haveleaint, fiom a special communication, addressed to us by a corresp mde .t Paris, that the Archbishop of that city has rq-igneil his I 1>" r seat in the Privy Council ot the Empire. This circum- stance has produced a profound impression, and will pro- bably encourage the Roman Catholic priesthood of France to adopt a still more determined attitude in op- position to the anti-Papal policy of the Emperor,s Gov- ernment. Our readers will at once appreciate the signi- ficance of the archbishop's decision when we remind them that the Privy Council, from which his nrice has retired, is the Supreme Council of the State, destined by the Emperor to assist the Empress in conducting the Government of France in the event of his Majesty being called upon to assume the regency during the minority of the Prince Imperial. The "rivy Council was created by the Emperor immediately after the Orsini Conspiracy, with the object of guarding the succession of the Prince Imperial against the dangers to which it woull be ex- posed in the event of the Emperor's sudden or premature death, In numbers it was very limited, and exclusively composed of adherents of the Napoleon dynasty. This demonstration on the part of his grace is the more strik- ing, inasmuch as he does not belong to the Ultramontane party, but was the nominee of the existing Government, by whom he was selected, about three years aso, to suc- cepd Archbishop Sibourg, whose terrible end must be fresh in the recollection of the public. Immediately after Count Walewski's resignation an Imperial decree bestowed a salary of 100,000fr. upon each member of the council, and the conduct of the retiring prelate in abandoning so lucrative a sinecure, has elicited univer- sal admiration, although the cause which he has cnnsci. entiously endeavoured to serve by this abnegation is not supported by popular sympathy in the French capital. WONDBBTUI TAKE OF MACKEREL.âA great excite- ment was occasioned at Portsmouth on Monday and Tuesday, owing to the successive arrivals of fishing boats so deeply laden with mackerel as scarcely to be safe. Many were obliged to let go their nets to save the ves- sels from swamping. According to tonnage, some had 40,000 on board, and so down to 10,000. It is reckon- ed that upwards of a million and half of this favourite fish were netted within a few miles of the Isle of Wight The scene at Portsmouth was of the most lively des- cription. Waggons, omnibuses, and carts, were charter- ed at fabulous prices to convey them to the rail ft r Lon- don, &e. One speculative butcher on the point invested S700 in a ready-money purchase, and got the first start for London and Brighton. CASE OF THE KEY. J. HATCH.âIn the Court of Queen's Bench, on Monday, Mr Edwin James obtained a rule calling upon Mr Walter Platt, attorney, to explain his conduct in reference to the prosecution of the Rev. H. J. Hatch, who was convicted at the November crim- inal sessions of indecently assaulting two little girls. Mrs Hatch made an affidavit that Mr Pratt had, pre- vious to the trial, urged that if she gave her husband's address, and he acknowledged his guilt and apologised, no further proceedings would be taken but if he did not surrender and admit his guilt he would be advertised and a reward of;EIOO given for his apprehension. Mrs. Hatch maintained her husband's innocence, and Mr. Hatch deposed upon oath that he was innocent. The Home Secretary, however, upon an application for a free pardon, replied that he had been informed that Mr. Hatch had admitted his guilt to Mr. Pratt.-Rule to be made returnable on Friday. THE ANGLO-FRENCH COMMERCIAL TREATY The Times, in a leader on the commercial treaty with France, eayg it entirely protests against breaking down the sim. plicity of our commercial principles by giving a foreign country treaty-righta over what is essentially a question of home policy. What precise amount of advantage thera may be in a step by which France, having compelled us to raise our war expenditure by some £10,000,000, is now seeking to diminish our revenue, at the same time to provide for herself with the two most important ele- ments of war. coal and iron, we may perhaps, consider on another occasion; but we confess we are very jealous and not without reason, of anything that resembles a de- parture from or a relinquishment of the principles of free trade. Our shipowneis are roaring for reciprocity. What answer are we to make to them if we enter into a com- mercial treaty with France? If we can lower the duty on wine, in order to obtain a relaxation of one prohi- bition, why should we not prohibit foreigners from shar- ing our coasting trade, in order to obtain a relaxation of another ? IMPORTANT DISCOVERY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.âII ei Majesty's ship Plumper" arrived at Esquimault on iHe lit of November frm Nanaimo, having concluded her surveying operations on the northern part of the Strait of Georgia for the present season. During this cruiso several new anchorages have been discovered and sur- veyed between Nanaimo and Cape Laz (or Point Holmes as it is sometimes called) a distance of about 50 miles. But perhaps the most important discovciy is the exist- ence of a considerable river in Vancouver's Island, navi- gable for boats or small stern-wheel steamers, on the banks of which are extensive tracts of excellent land, varying from 20 to 100 deg. in elevation, and clothed with a rich luxuriant grass. This land is ready for the plough, is entirely clear of the pine trees, and studded here and there with a better kind of oak than is usually found on the cleared lands of Vancouver's Island. This river, which has received the name of Courtcnay, in honour of Admiral Courtenay, who formerly commanded Her Majesty's ship Constance in these waters, empties itself into a good and spacieus harbour, Port Augustus which lies in about 49 36 north latitude, and is scarcely 50 miles from Nanaimo. Major Dowoie was on his way down from the Upper Frazar River region by the Lillooet trail and Port Douglas. There were reports of his hav- ing made some valuable geographical discoveries on his journey from the coast to Port Alexander, among which were a chain of lakes extending along the route 150 miles, so that steamers drawing 12 inches of water can navgiate a distance of 100 miles further than steamers drawing four feet, which latter run on Senas River, and a practical portage of 40 miles will then reach Fort Alex- ander. These reports are looked upon at Victoria as im- portant, as, if true, the upper mining districts will be, much more accessible than heretofore, being brought: almost within wakr communication of Victoria.- Gaita- dian News, A STRANGE VISITOR.âBetween Horndon and Lain- don hills lives a farmer named Sparks, a man of large property, hit household consisting of Mrs Sparks and her daughter, and Misa Lawrence, a young lady well known as possessing great personal attractions. Besides the female domestics, two strong horsemen or farm la- bourers lodge in the house. One night, a short time since, after the family had retired to rest, some person knocked for admission, but proving to be a strauger and with a very lame story, he was refused, and the family returned to their couches. The next night he managed to admit himself by entering the window of an unoc- cupied bedroom, accordingly went down the back stairs. The barking of the dog awoke MiM Lawrence, and she thought she distinctly heard foot&teps below. She di- reotly lighted a candle at her night lamp, went down, and on opening the door, a slight, genteel-looking young man, bearing in his hand a sheathed sword, entered the hall. M?s,L,w,ence, who was but slighUyohf], having come from her bedroom, asked him what he wanted ? Hold- ing the sword over her head in a menacing attitude, he asked. -1 Where ia your papa ? I must have ten pounds from him;" at the same time assuring her, in the kind- est manner possible, that he would not hurt a single hair of her head. Miss Lawrence called out, and Mrs Sparks came down with the servants, male and female, and de. sired the stranger to quit the house. He refused to do so, and insisted going over it. The two men servants made no attempt to expel him in fact the louts seemed 80 paralysed with fear at this young man (whom one of them might have swung round with little exertion) that Mrs Sparks has since averred, she believes had he stamp- ed his foot they would have gone into fits. The stranger, eaying he would not do them any harm, then proceeded to walk over the house, apparently with no settled pur- pose, for he passed by the plate, which was in its usual place, without taking anything, and danced his unwill. ing attendants up and down the house for an hour, try- lug Mr Sparks' door, which, however, that gentleman kept most firmly closed by his superior strength from the inside, defying the efforts of the intruder to force an entrance. Finding Mr Sparks' room was inaccessible, he then descended with the male and female attendants. On arriving in the hail he placed his hand upon Miss Lawrences shoulder, and, in a kind and almost affection* ate manner, begged her to retire again to rest, as she might take cold, and observing some boots, he loolSod down at his own, and remarked they were not over good, so he would take a pair. Miss Lawrence, glad to get rid of the man, gave him her free permission to do so, which he did, and, bowing most politely, said, Thank you good night." He then went out at the door, much to Miss Lawrence's relief and the inexpiessible delight of the two clowns, by this time almost dead with (ear. in- formation was given next day to the police, but no trace has yet been found of the man, who was described as young and gentlemanly looking, w ith a most pleasing address and insinuating manner. It is imagiued that he tnust be an escaped lunatic. Altogether the affair has created the greatest excitement in the neighbourhood and its vicinity, it being one of the most extraordinary circumstances that has occurred for some time.â GMmJori Chronicle, <

I THE GREAT EASTERN. 1

FEARFUL CATASTROPHE AT ST.…

[No title]

J PJSRPRI(T YEWI-I. )

SHERIFFS FOR ENGLAND AND WALES…

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

I - ULAhK-

[No title]