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RUSSIA AND TURKEY.

FRANCE. I

I ITALY.-

AMERICA. II

,INDIA AND CHINA.

THE CIVIL WAR IN CHINA.

I;f-orrigu,& (Eotoniot Jlisttlloiti).…

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;f-orrigu,& (Eotoniot Jlisttlloiti). Turkish Punishment of Conjugal Infidelity.-A Turkish woman was lately sacked and thrown into the Bosphorus. A very intelligent man, who was at the pier when she was brought down to the caique, describes her as a young woman of 22 or 23 years, strikingly beautiful; and, with the exception of a short quick sob in her throat as if she had wearied herself out with weeping, she was quite calm, and submitted composedly to her fate. She was let down by two soldiers, in her usual dress, her yaslnnack only torn from her face, and rowed off to the mouth of the bay, where the sack was drawn over her without resistance. The plash of her body in the sea was distinctly seen by the crowd who had followed her to the water. It is horrible to reflect on these summary executions, knowing, as we do, that the poor victim is taken before the judge, upon the least jealous whim of her husbund or master, condemned often upon bare suspicion, and hurried instantly from the tri- bunal to this violent and revolting death. Any suspicion of coniiiiei-ce with a Christian particularly is, with or without evidence, instant ruin. Not long ago the inhabitants of Ar- naout-keni, a pretty village on the Bosphorus, were shocked with the spectacle of a Turkish woman and a young Greek hanging dead from the shutters of a window on the water side. He had been detected in leaving her house at day-break, and m less than an hour the unfortunate lovers had met their fate. They are said to have died most heroically, embracing and 'de- clanng their attachment to the last. Such tragedies occur every week or two in Constantinople, and it is not wonderful, considering the superiority of the educated and picturesque Greek, to his brutal neighbour, or the daring and romance of Europeans in the pursuit of forbidden happiness. The liberty of going and coming which the Turkisli women enjoy, wrapped only in veils, which assist by their secresy, is temptingly favourable to intrigue, and the self-sacrificing nature of the sex when the heart is concerned, shows itself here in proportion to the demand for it.-N.P. Willis's Summer Cruise in the Mediterranean. Extraordinary Case of lethargy.âA French paper relates the following singular case of lethargy On the evening of the 30th lilt., a young man, the son of a widow residing at Illhcensern, who had been ill for some time, died. His mother, who is a poor woman, went to some of her neighbours to pro- cure a shirt and sheet to prepare the body for interment. The mother and a neighbour then set about the melancholy opera- tion, but met with, an impediment which somewhat retarded them. The deceased had a deformed foot, which they thought would prevent the body from going into the coffin. In order to remove this obstacle they resolved on breaking the bone, which was done, and the body was laid out as straight as though it never had been deformed. The body was then carried into another room and covered with a sheet, About II o'clock at night, the woman, who was to watch the body, entered the room to trim the lamp, and remarked that the sheet over the body had been moved. She called the mother, and on exami- nation it was found that the leg had again resumed its deformed position. In about a quarter of an hour the young man wns seen to breathe, and soon after he spoke, complained of hun'ger and thirst, and demanded a glass of wine and something to eat. He then related to the persons near him that lie had been ,a Ion, journey, a long journey, and that he had spoken to his father and some friends in another world. The young man is still alive, but is not out of danger. A Murderer's ScruplesâTwo priests of the little town of Cabo-Currubeda, province of Galicia, in Spain, long entertained a mortal hatred of each other. Eight nights ago, the younger of the two went out with his domestic, and waited at the corner of a l street until the other priest appeared. They then stabbed him with a poignard until lie fell dead. The two criminals were immediately arrested:-it was not difficult to discover them, as the priest had by mistake left his own umbrella by the side of the corpse and had taken that of the victim. The domestic, when arrested, had his hands bloody, and the poig- nard with which the crime was committed was found in his pocket. On the tonsure of the murdered man the letters M. J." were cut. They are the initials of <! Mary and Jesus," and it is a common belief in the province that if a priest be suddenly killed, the cutting of these letters on his tonsure will save him from damnation. It is believed that they were cut by the priest from a feeling of charity.âGalignani. Abbas Pasha and his Dog.âAbbas Pasha lately obtained from England, by great exertions, a gigantic mastiff, of the celebrated Lyme breed, and the monster was the talk of the whole city of Cairo. As the Pasha's private secretary pro- ceeded through tlio narrow streets, accompanied by his very docile but very formidable-looking acquisition, the Turks did not fly, nor did they seek shelter, nor put themselves in attitude of resistance. They stood still and trembled. Some muttered only" Wonderful I wonderful!" others adopted literally the Haydon phrase, Our trust is in God." One old man was heard to exclaim, "Many of the creations of God are terrible!" and another gravely asked the dignified dog, Art thou sent to consume us utterly?" The general expression, however, was, "God can protect us even from thee, oh terrible olle Xew Quarterly Review for October.

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