Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

■.—j WORDS UPON THE WATERS.

ADVANTAGE OF OPPOSITION. I

[No title]

ANOTHER STÁNGE STORY.—COMMUNING…

[No title]

[No title]

HOUSE OF LORDS, FRIDAY, AUG.…

HOUSE OF. COMMONS, FRIDAY,…

ITHE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA—A…

.THE INSURRECTION IN SPAIN.…

THE WAR.I

INVASION OF THE CRIMEA.I

PROSPECTS OF THE COMING HARVEST.

A LETTER FROM THE SEAT OF…

News
Cite
Share

A LETTER FROM THE SEAT OF WAR. I The annexed letter received in Carmarthen, will be read with interest by many a countryman of the writer, and requires no further apology for its insertion in our columns:â Yuksakova Plains, Camp Devna Road. 9th July, 1851. My dear Brother and Sister,âIt is with pleasure I sit down on the green grass to scribble these few lines to inform you what has occurred since I wrote to you last from Varna. About 3 a.m. on the 3rd inst., the second division of the British force serving in Turkey was seen busy at work in striking their tents and packing them on their bat-horses. At 4 a.m., they were seen standing under arms in contiguous co- lumns of distance facing the road to Schumala;âthe first Brigade in front-the Artillery immediately in rear-the 2nd Brigade next, and the baggage in rear of the whole. At 4 £ they were seen moving off en route of columns of sections, righj, in front, bands playing and colours cased. The scene of the country on either side of us was beautiful and the roads excellent. I cannot call them roads either, because they are fields-yes, where many a bloody battle has been fought be- tween the Russians and Turks. However, on we went until we arrived on a large plain near a small village called Carrig- oul, where we encamped, intending to march early the follow- ing morning, but during the night the order was counter- manded, and we had to remain there till further orders. About 3 a.m. on the 6th inst., the 2nd Division was again seen busy at the same work as on the 3rd, at 44 a.m., we began our way across the green fields. The mornings on each occasion were beautifulâthe earth fresh with dew-the sky clear and cloud- less-altid the sun shining beautifully on the numerous fields of ripe waving corn, which would afford concealment to troops in action. On we went until we arrived on the plains of Yuk- sakova, where we halted and eneamped, surrounded on all sides with woods and hills-not,a house near, except a small village on the top of one of the hills on our right. To the left of the village the Light Division are encamped, three miles on our right,âand three miles on our left the 1st Division are en- camped, alongside a beautiful lake. The 3rd Division are be- tween us and Varna, and the French are on our extreme right, crowning the hills and valleys. We don't know (or. at least, I don't) how far we are from the enemy: it is rumoured they have retired across the Danube. I gave you a little account from Constantinople how well we were supplied with good rations, but since leaving that place (I am sorry to say) are quite the reverse. I suppose they have left all the ale and porter behind at Constantinople to fatten the Turks or some- body else, &c., &c. We have a few Greeks following us with poisonous wine and charging what they like for it. The French have their own country people following them with everything they want, good and cheap in fact, they are kings towards us, poor fellows. The French are better clothed and equipped in every shape and form than us, and have not so much to carry as what we have. Our men might be heard groaning under the following load, viz. --One musket, waist belt and bayonet pouch and pouch belt, 60 rounds of ammu- nition, one pair of trowsere, one shirt, one pair of socks, one pair of boots, one pair of soles, heels, and welts, one forage cap, one pair of mitts, one brush, one account book, hold-all, blacking, one towel, smock frock, mess tin andxover, haver- sack, wooden canteen with water, rations (if anfean be had), great coat, blanket, and certain individuals have added to this the camp-kettle or bill-hook-quite sufficient, you will admit, under an eastern sun, to ruin the constitution of a donkey. Our army is in every respect 40 or 50 years behind that of France, and it is most grievous to the feelings of an English- man to behold the contrast. The utmost cordiality exists be- tween the troops, and I frequently saw them like boon com- panions, making a most riotous noise over their liquors," al- though the only French the Englishman attemptt is Vive Napoleon J" while the Frenchman confines himself to Vive Victoria Regina Ingleez Bool," &c., &c. I have nothing more of any consequence to inform you at present, so I shall draw my scribble to a conclusion, hoping and trusting they will reach you all enjoying good health and happiness. Give my love to all our relations and my kindest remembrance to all old friends-too numerous to mention, and tell them I am quite well, thanks be to God. It is a sad and desolate feeling to fancy that we must be buried in a far distant land, from our kindred and our home, and that unheeding strangers will tread on the place of our repose. 'Tis sad to die on the battle field, to find a grave so far from the land of the long yellow broom and purple heather. But, dear friends, do not think that my spirits are low or that my courage is dimmed;âno, I have the spirit of a soldier and a heart that's not afraid. Al- though I may never again behold my own dear native land, my home, and my kindred, yet, I will bravely look forward to our re-union in our Heavenly Father's Home, where there is nothing but perfeet happiness, and that in unity. How sweet it will be to call God our Father, Jesus our elder brother, and all the companions of Heaven our friends. Farewellâ farewell. I remain, your affectionate brother, J W. D-t Sergeant.

OUTH WALES RAILWAY.

CARMARTHEN CORN RETURNS.

WEEKLY CALENDAR.

Advertising