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REMARKABLE FIRE IN SLIOREDITCti.-Tue-,daye,en- ing, shortly before six o'clock, an accident of a very singular character, and which occasioned considerable excitement in the neighbourhood, took place in High- street, Shoreditch, nearly facing the Eastern Counties Rtul?ay terminus. It appears that a numbM of men were endued in unloading a waa?on niled?Rth pun- cheons of turpentine. One of the immense casks having been attached to a crane belonging to Messrs. Gabcy and Wells, wholesale oilmen, had been drawn up some distance, when, by some mishap the head of the pun- cheon came out, and the whole of its contents fell to the ground. A lad, who was standing by, was in the act of lighting a cigar with a iucifer match, and the vapour of the turpentine coming in contact with the light, the whole of the 120 gallons of spirits became ignited, and the flames rose in one immense sheet upwards of 20 feet, setting on fire the shop front and side doors of the defunct Parcels Post depot. At the same time the sheet of flame was drawn under the archway at the side of Messrs. Gabey's oil stores, and for some time it was feared that those premises would have been destroyed. A number of the inhabitants and several of the men employed on the premises rendered essential aid, and succeeded in getting the fire extinguished, but not until considerable damage was done to the premises numbered 223, and the whole of the turpentine destroyed. Such was the alarm created in the district, that messengers were dispatched in all directions for the engines. Mr. Braidwood, the superintendent of the brigade, and Mr. Fogo, the foreman of the A section, quickly attended with four engines, but, fortunately, their services were not required. GOOD PAY.â"In Aberdeen the streets are swept every day, at an annual cost of £ 1,400, and the refuse brings in E2000 a year. In Perth the scavenging costs 1:1,300 per annum, and the manure sella for £ 3,730. Here, then, is a gain of sterlinggold- a premium for saving immortal jifo.â'The Topic. A LAMENT FOR THE COACH AND THB ROAD.- Alas, for the coaches and the coachmen, the box and the ribbons, and the trotting tits; for the idle, pleasant, good-humoured, critical crowd at the inn door alas, for mine host and the inn for. the pretty lass and the nice glass of beer" from her raised hand, and for poor Jim, too The portly host is gone, wasted away to a I tlat0n11;" the inn is turned into three "private" houses, with just that privacy, and no more, which con- sists with passages in common, and partitions of two thicknesses of canvass and paper. Betsey is gone to London or "somewhere" to service; and Jim, poor fellow, is gone to the dogs, in company with the teams. We mourn, but yeTailways, we mourn not for you. What is the polished brass of the locomotive engine to the brightness of the coach harness, in its best polish, I and adorned with flowers on a gala-day, though the poor remnants of it now drag cabbages to market; and what is that earth-born, mine-bred engine-tending race, li, ill. nowhere and everywhere, grimy birds (not) of paradise, never touching the earth-what are they to our coach- man? Ala, and again alas for our coachman. Who now shall guide us to pleasant villages, and tell of the hidden hamlet, of whose whereabout the half-hidden spire I just whispers ? who shall tell us of the wealthy farmer, living at Littlestoke, and of his humours and odd ways?" who shall be historiographer to squires and nobles, and tell of their houses and broad lands, and their boundaries who shall entertain us with personal and historical anecdote, all the long summer day ? Lament for the coachman and the coach box for the fresh breezes and soft summer air, for waving corn fields and shady lanes; for the sweeping downs and the soft vales, and tbdr bubbling brooks. May there be forgiveness for us for old ill-timed jokes, for depreciating hints of the scrubby team of the middle stage, and for malicious libels on decent cattle, vilified as three blind uns and a bolter Two distant lovers may now, indeed, be made happy, space being annihilated by-raii- way and magnetic telegraph but little does young England know what it has lost in losing the coach and the road. England will soon be an unknown country, except to pilgrims of nature, who, in love and reverenre, will seek the nooks and corners, the villages, and little market towns, which make old England.âOxford Pro- tenia n i Miy. i We cannot insert, or notice in any way, any commu- nication that is sent to us anonymously but those who choose to address us in confidence will find their con- fidence respected. Neither can we undertake to return any manuscripts whatever. The publication of the Welshman commences on Fri- day morning in time for the Glamorganshire mail, which I leaves Carmarthen at eight o'clock. I-

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.I

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LOCAL INTELLIGENCE. -"'.J''-'''''-V'''-''-''-

CARMARTHEN TOWN COUNCIL. II

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