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THE CHURCH AND THE WORKHORSE.

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THE CHURCH AND THE WORKHORSE. The subjoined paragraphs are from an article in the Municipal and Poor-Law Gazette. The subject is al- luded to also in our Religious Intelligence" The Times (and in this the Bishop of Exeter set the example) dwells upon the inadequate remuneration to the chaplains. It is first pretended that the attendance in the workhouse is more onerous, because the poor are concentrated there, than the religious cure of the same number of parishioners would be if they were dispersed in their separate dwellings all over a Cornish parish. This representation requires no refutation. But then the Journalist and his Lordship both complain of the rate of remuneration. To make their case the better, they invent a scale of salary which does not exist: for his Lordship thinks proper to exclude from his calcu- lation the places where the highest salaries are paid, such as London, Manchester, and a few others which he does not specify, and by some means arrives at an ave- rage salary not exceeding £ 37 a-year. The Times says â" Now, the returns assert that out of 587 Unions, 414 have (nominally) chaplains attached to them, and 102 have none. Of these 414, how many, we ask, are in the predicament of Redruth, with a nomi- nal chaplain at El a-year." Surely, if the Times wan- ted an answer, it had it even in the Bishop of Exeter's figures. On Thursday last it returns to the subject, referring to stipends beautifully graduated from £0., i I.E., 10£., £ 20., to an average of 37. per annum." Now is it credible that the Times, when it takes the Bishop's average as £37 a year, docs not perceive the obvious effect, that, for as many salaries as there are of £ 0., £ 1., ;CIO., E20. and other sums below C37, a year, there must, to make an average, be just as great a proportion above £:37 a year. This, however, is but a part of the misrepresentation for the simple fact de- monstrated by the returns is, that of the chaplains to these 414 workhouses, 400 are paid, and 29 act gratu- itously. The aggregate salaries of those paid is £ 18,606., or £ 46 10s. each. This may still be an adequate stipend but it is to be remembered, that it is a new accession of funds to the Church, out of a source from whence nothing of the kind was derived before the New Poor Law, and paid in many instances to incumbents or curates already having spiritual cure of the very same paupers on whose account this addition is made. Moreover, it would have been but fair if his Lordship, when he complained of the smallness of this provision made by the general law, the growth of times when the Church was without an opponent, out of the noble funds appropriate to the Chnrch. His Lordship's own diocese would have fur- nished him with a list of 37 curates whose average stipends are C4,3 7s. 6-id. or El 2s. Gid. less than the average of the salary of the Union Chaplains or if his Lordship would have extended his researches into clerical incomes as widely as he did into chaplains is equal to the annual value of 435 of the lowest class of livings. Perhaps his Lordship, if he had considered these facts a little more carefully a littJe more carefully, might have seen some peril to the Church in calling attention to circumstances, which to many persons will rather serve to show that the Poor Law Commissioners have sinned by over zeal in the cause of the Church. The sum they have thus caused to be spent in a manner which, but for his Lordship's motion, might have escaped observation, amounts to nearly two-thirds of the sum granted annually by Parliament for the purposes of national education; a sum which Parliament would be very jealous of allowing to be applied to exclusively to the purposes of the Establishment.

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