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HOUSE OF LORDS.—THURSDAY,…

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THE SLIDING SCALE FOR EVER.…

THE LANDLORD-LEAGUE—PHILOSOPHY…

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THE LANDLORD-LEAGUEâPHILOSOPHY OF. One consequence of the conspiracy, into which the Duke of Richmond and his associated noblemen and gentlemen have entered with the Essex farmers, will be to free Sir Robert Peel from his pledge not to meddle with the Corn-law as it now stands. "I pledged my- self," the Premier may say, not to unsettle the Corn- law again, so long as, by appearing to give reasonable satisfaction, it did not become an instrument of agita- tion. But that promise cannot continue binding after the Corn-law has become the professed bone of conten- tion between two great organized associations, whose controversies and counter-agitations disturb the peace of the country and unsettle industry. You, gentlemen of the Central Association for the Protection of Agri- culture, have conspired with the Anti-Corn-law League to drive me to deal with the question of the Corn-law and I must deal with it in a way calculated to settle the controversy for ever." A possible consequence of the Richmond and Essex conspiracy, unless Sir Robert feels himself strong enough to tread out the embers of agitation in this de- cided way, will be a reconstruction of political parties. All English parties have been formed upon some ab- stract principle and political leaders have in general rather undertaken to patronise the holders of such a principle than to adopt it unreservedly. The original Whigs who effected the Revolution were,not Dissenters, and were rather lukewarm Churchmen but they ob- tained the support both of the Established Church and the iNonconiormist, ooay by undertaking to defend them against Popery and the combined forces of the latitudinarian Whig noblemen and Protestants over- came the combined forces of the King and Roman Ca- tholics. So, at a later period, the Reformer William Pitt, combined with the Anti-jacobins, overcame the posse-comitatus of the Whig party allied with the De- mocrats. And thus we see at present two sections of the nobility preparing to recruit the ranks of their po- litical followers the one by undertaking to patronize the lecturers on Free Trade, the other by extending their tutelary care to the advocates of Protection. Ana- logy augurs more favourably of the prospects of the party which seeks the alliance of the Anti-Corn-law League. James the second identified himself with the Roman Catholic cause; lie sought to make a Roman Catholic party and he was borne down by the aristo- cracy which merely undertook to defend the organized Protestant body already in existence, without affecting to be animated by sectarian bigotry. William Pitt, while doing the work of the Church and King" party, continued to avow his opinions in favour of Parlia- mentary reform, religious equality, and free trade and he triumphed over the section of the Whig party which identified itself with the Friends of the People." Apply these precedents to the present case. Lord Spen- cer adopts the principles of the League, but disclaims being a member of it. Lords Fitzwilliam and Morpeth, not to men tion others, while they sanction the proceed- ings of the League, hold themselves open to compromise. And this League, the alliance of which is courted by these noble politicians, is a formidable organization to advocate an abstract principle of Free Trade, and the wealthy economical church-which sprung into exis- tence without their co-operation. Even the wealthy capitalists who are at the head of the League can scarce- ly be said to have made it: that honour belongs to the thinkers who puzzled out the principle of Free Trade, and the writers who scattered the knowledge of it abroad, long years before the millowners would listen to their teaching. The nucleus of the Corn-law party is the large portion of the public which believes in Free Trade in the abstract and it is the more intelligent portion of its number who lend the League its moral power. The Central Association has no such nucleus, of disinterested or fanatical believers. The tenant-far- mers may be the counterparts of the millowners, but where are the abstract thinkers and their converts to represent in the agricultural party those with whom the millowners are associated ? And the noble Lords of Richmond, Buckingham, &c., do not act like Lord Spen- cer, who avows the opinions of the League without joining it or like Lords Fitzwilliam and Morpeth, who sanction its proceedings under reserve. Lords Rich- mond and Buckingham are members of their own League, and committed to all its objects. Nay, more, the Richmond-Buckingham party are in reality the origi- nators of their Central Association, as much as James the second was of the Roman Catholic party for which he became a martyrâlosing three kingdoms for its sake. Their opponents have found a League ready made; and to counterbalance it, they are trying to make a League of their own. This is going beyond Mrs. Glasse's precept, and cooking the hare before try- ing to catch it. It would be presumptuous to undertake to foretell the exact kind and extent of modification which our commercial code is ultimately to undergo in consequence of the present Free Trade agitation. But if the Go- vernment, from inability or want of courage to settle the Corn-law question, allow" free trade" ana" re- stricted trade to become the standing pass-words of political party, there can be little doubt that the pros- pects of the political leaders who shall adopt the for- mer device are by far the more promising.âSpectator. Poon LAW AMENDMENT BILI..âThis bill will be committed on Monday, the 11th of March, having been read a second time, without discussion, on Friday night. Mr Borthwick has given notice that he will, when the order of the day for committing the bill is read, call the attention of the house: to the state of the existing laws for regulating the administration of relief to the poor.

GRIEVANCES OF THE COAL-MINER^.—THEI…

THE CHURCH OF SOUTH WALES.…

ITHE LATE REBECCAITE TRIALS.—(HOUSE…

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LONDON GAZETTE.I

TO READERS AND CORRESPONDENTS.I

——1ii11I WEEKLY CALENDAR.…

-TIDE _TABLE. ~~~I

AGRICULTURE, MARKETS, &c.

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HOUSE OF COMMONS.—WEDNESDAY,…