Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

BEFORE MR. WILSON.

ITHE GREAT MEETING AT SWANSEA.…

News
Cite
Share

I THE GREAT MEETING AT SWANSEA. I I [From the I The character of the meeting at Swansea, was the more remarkable, inasmuch as that it was not only the largest meeting ever held in that town, but was the first ever held by that portion of the community, purposely proclaimed by the intrigues of the two extreme factions in the coun- try, hostile to the views of those classes immediately above it. The very first resolution proposed at this re- markable meeting of working men was, "That this meet- mg consider; the corn and provision laws to be unjust in principle, and partial and oppressive in their operation, inasmuch as, by enhancing the price of food, they tend to deprive tlie industrious classes of emyl wymcnl." And j this resolution, striking in itself, was literally introduced by the clear-stated and emphatic record of opinion, that its proposer regarded the meeting as one of those simulta- neous efforts ichich are now making in different parts of the country to hriny thedifferent classes of society tollletitt-r in an effort to remove those obstacles ichich prevent their co-opera- tion, and to remove that unpleasant feeliny which has hitherto too much prcmifcd." The originator of the second resolution likewise ushered in his appeal for universal suffrage in these words :â" Lt- the xcorkmy and the midddle classes unite, and universal snf- fraye will be earned -by moral force alone." Such was the animus pervading this highly-important assembly, of which we may assume that it gives the nega- tive direct to the assertion, or aspersion, that the indus- trial and middle classes are not impelled together on the same flood-tide of national interests. In fact, the true position of circumstances is, the peri- lous situation of the country imperatively calls for the most complete association of these two great classes, who in reality compose the body and bulk of the nation, in contradistinction to the aristocratic ranks, which are an excrescence on the natural surface of society, and the factions in multiform ramification issuing from these, and which are the gigantic obstacle in the way of popular pro- gress. It is this paction between the middle and working classes which must be distinctly understood to constitute the national })(I rf II. This party is distinct from every other designation of party which has ever been instituted in this country. Its aims are the most clearly defined, the least involved, and the most practicable of any ever at- tempted to be reduced to a formulary of action. It enrols under its banner all that liberty can devise of indepen- dence-tll that prosperity can devise of liappiness-all that enlIghtenment can suggest of political philosophy. **â¢* » How shall a PEEL Government sustain itself against the oryanized opposition of a party, marshalling millions un- der its banner, and intelligent enough to preserve order and union?

CSE OF LORDS.-THCRSDA Y, FIB.…

TTOISE OF COMMONS.—THURSDAY,…

GLAMORGANSHIRE ASSIZES,

THE PERIODICALS. I

BENEFIT SOCIETIES.-ODD FELLOWS…

[No title]

Advertising

I -TO READERS AND CORRESPONDENTS.

[No title]