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THE BRAZILIAN REVOLT. I

WAR IX SOUTH AFRICA-

THE CHOLERA EPIDEMIC. ! I

THE MOORISH OUTBREAK. I

THE ENGLISH COAL WAR.

¡MINISTERIAL CRISIS INI I…

'I' A TRIO OP GERMAN I i SUICIDES.I

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AMERICA CUP RACE

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AMERICA CUP RACE THE DEFEAT OF THE VALKYRIE. CAPTAIN CRANFIELD SURPRISED AT THE RESULT. LORD DUNRAVEN HOPEFUL. INTERFERENCE OF EXCURSION BOATS. AOULUENT TO THE VIGILANT. A Router's telegram from New York on Mon- day evening says Captain Cranfield, of the aU;jrie, stated in the course of an interview this evening in reference to the victory of the Vigilant It was not a bad day We had a good fair breeze, and not too much of it. I must say we are very much disappointed. We thought after the race on Saturday that we should do better on a triangular course than in a leeward or windward race, instead of which the Vigilant beat us on the wind and off it, and when ihe wind freshened and I thought we should catch her she walked away from us. When we had gone about five miles I thought we should have passed her, but very much to our surprise from then to the end she, gained. I expect her movements early in the race were due to her centre-board. That's my idea. 1 mean that she had not got it down to suit her. I knew after Saturday that we had a hard nut to crack, but I could not believe that we could have been so well beaten. We knew from what the Navahoe could do that the Vigilant must be far in front of her." Captain Cranfield, in reply to a pointed question, would not admit the centre. board to be better than a keel, and said, We can show you some other experiments. I regret we didn't win. It would have been better if we had won in order that a boat should be sent over to us. In that case even more improvements might be made on yachting lines. If ever you had to send a boat to England you would find it difficult to get the cup back." A Dalziel's telegram from New York on Tuesday says :âAs the Vigilant returned to her anchorage off the Bay Riding yesterday after- noon at five o'clock she was received with a burst of cheering, whilst the guns of the Atlantic yacht clubs fired a salute. Every steam yacht and river steamboat shrilled a greeting to the American Cup defender. The Valkyrie came to anchor about half a mile from the Vigilant, when the Earl of Dunraven and his guests left her for New York in it steam launch. Captain Cranfield, Mr. Watson (who designed her), and Mr. Ramsey, the sailmaker, were rowed ashore to the Atlantic Club house. WHAT THE VIGILANT'S OWNER THINKS. Dalziel's representative then boarded the Vigilant and found Mr. Oliver Iselin surrounded by a crowd of happy guests. What do you think of the result, Mr. Iselin r asked the correspondent. "The result is a good one; don't you think so f" answered Mr. Iselin. Were you interfered with by any of the excursion l'oats 2 1. No the boats, for the most part, behaved splendidly. Except at the start, there was no crowding of the yachts at all. 4i De you think, Mr. Iselin, that the Vigilant could beat the Valkyrie in a 'heavy sea with housed topmasts ?' I believe that the Vigilant could beat her under any conditions," was the answer. Were there any accidents of any kind during the race ? Yes," replied Mr. Iselin-then hastily correcting himself after exchanging a glance with Mr. Herbert Leeds. I may state, on the authority of Mr. Lathaiii Fish, of the Regatta Committee, that there was an accident. The Vigilant sprung her bowsprit after she passed the second stakeboat." "What do you think of the Valkyrie P 4; She is the fastest boat ever sent over here, and an especially dangerous adversary in a light wind. The first forty minutes proved that I am right in the opinion I have always held that the Valkyrie's best point .3 going to windward in a light breeze. "Whatdoyotithink of only one gun being fired at the start ? (At this there was IL general chorus of" Oh, oh.") 4* I think it very pretty," answered Mr. Iselin- It hasn't, however, been of much use as yet.' It looked a little risky for the American to the people on the excursion steamers at the start," said the correspondent, "All thought the Valkyrie was leaving us behind at the start," replied Mr. Iselin "and that did look badly enough for us." Why did the Vigilant lag back so much at the start? All her head sails were fluttering in the wind. Was it to prevent her blanketing the Valkyrie, or because you were afraid of getting her back draught-" It was done to keep clear of the Valkyrie's weather quarter; that was all." At that moment Mr. Gouverneur Kortwright, the fleet captain, stepped aboard and grasped Mr. Herbert Leeds by the hand, shouting, "Wasn't it a race." Mr. Leeds acquiesced, saying, It was the best race 1 ever was in." "But why did you change your fore-staysail when you rounded the first stakeboat inquired Mr. Kortwright. Mr. Iselin asked it for the reach, and ordered up the balloon foretopsail. "Why did you take in your baby jibtopsail on the reach home ? Was it too much for you to carry ? Did the wind haul off to the west- ward?" asked our correspondent. No," answered Mr. Iselin, "but I did not wish to take any risk when we were so far ahead, and was more inclined to make a sure finish than a brilliant one." OPINION OF THE VALKYRIE'S PILOT. A Dalziel's telegram from New York says Captain Lyons, the old Sandy Hook pilot, who sailed on board the Valkyrie during the race, returned to the shore as soon as the Valkyrie dropped her anchor. He bore the defeat philo' sophically. It was a good race," said the old man, a good race. Everything was fair and square as conld be. We were honestly beaten. The Vigi- lant is a fine boat, but too big for use. Yes, iL fine boat. I knew when the race started that the Vigilant was only feeling us, That's an old trick of Captain Herrebhoff's. If thecea. had beeneverso choppy the Valkyrie would have done no better than in this morning's rme We were fairly beaten. The Valkyrie's sailors looked rather glom at the result. Mr. Watson, the de-1 signer, and Mr. Ramsey, the sailmaker, were ashore. I believe they proceeded to rush their sorrow with a beefsteak." MR. WATSON ACKNOWLEDGES DEFEAT. What do yon think of the race asked Dalziel's correspondent of Mr. Watson later on. The latter answered, in a firm voice, The Vicilant would certainly have beaten us, bar any trouble or any accident. No, everything worked as it should on board. The Vigilant out-sailed us on every point-that is all." Do you think the Vigilant's victory attribu- table to the superior model of her hull or a greater area oi canvas P cannot say," answered Mr. Watson. The Vigilant certainly has a greater spread of canvas than the Valkyrie." What do you think of the Vigilant P" "That she is a remarkable boat; a truly remarkable boat." Do you think the Valkyrie would do better in a choppy sea?" I don't know that's flat. The Vigilant has outsailed her on every course and on every wind." How about that very short tack you made to windward before making the first stake- boat r" We did that to try and escape the wash of the excursion boats that interfered with us. One large steamer, with two funnels, came near us several times. Still, this had no effect on the race and could make a difference of but a very few seconds. That is all there is to say about the matter, except that it was in rather bad taste." After the Vigilant returned to Bay Ridge it was learnt that she had sprung her bowsprit on the way home. This report was confirmed by Mr. Latham Fish, of the America Cup com- mittee. Neither Mr. Iselin nor any of the other gentlemen on board the Vigilant cared to speak of the matter, and the extent of the injury could not be ascertained. A telegram has been sent, Dalziel's correspon- dent ascertained, to Peepgrass, at City Island, in Westchester County, New York, telling him to forward a new bowsprit to Bay Ridge to-day. It is not that the accident will cause any delay, as far as the obtaining of a new bowsprit is concerned, as the Vigilant's owners had dupli- cates made of all her spars early in the season. LORD DUNRAVEN'S OPINION. A Central News telegram from New York on Tuesday Hays :-111 an interview Lord Dunraven stated, referring to Monday's race, that the numberless excursion steamers and pleasure craft in attendance somewhat interfered with the free navigation of the competing vessels, and expressed an opinion that but for this cir- cumstance the Valkyrie would not have been beaten by more than five minutes. He thinks it probable that the Valkyrie will win the next race. In answer to the special correspondent of the J ~T' Gozette. his lordship ..id Several times our decks were swept with the wash, and twice I had to put about to avoid this annoyance. This took me out of the course and used up time. I don't say this annoyance was intentional, you know, but it was very dis- agreeable, and I don't believe I would have come over if I knew what I had to go through. I am of opinion that the course ought to be laid in "ome place where both boats could have a fair test." Do you think the racing committee could do anything to prevent 8, repetition of this crowd- ing"" No, I don't think they could. They have no jurisdiction over such matters. The puolic ought to have the good sense to keep out of tho way. That is the best way to show its appreciation of real sport." Do you think the result of the race demon- straties the superior sailing qualities of the centreboard type of craft r"â" You see, we cut my boat down at least a foot. I have no way of comparing her speed now with what she did last summer in English waters. Under condi- tions such as the race to-day, I have no hesita- tion in saying that the Vigilant is a faster boat. What she would do in a stiffer wind or what she would do with less wind is hard to determine. I am of the opinion that in heavier weather my boat might do better work. You will notice that the Navahoe, in all the races run off on the other side, did much better work in comparatively mild weather. She did not seem to be able to handle her sails on the roughest of the days." I don't mean to say that this would happen to the Vigilant. She might do as well in rough weatner as at any other time. It is merely a suggestion that occurred to me at the moment." What do you think your chances are for carrying home the cup? Well, if I had won cilryi?! race I would have thought they were pretty good. However, I am by no means dis- couraged. The Vigilant has demonstrated beyond any doubt that she is a great boat, a fast boat. As I said before I do not think I could have won with the Valkyrie." AMERICANS JUBILANT. A Central News telegram from New York on Tuesday sa.ys :-It has just transpired that the reason for the Vigilant lowering her baby jib. topsail in Monday's race was that she sprung her bowsprit during the first leg. The American press is jubilant, feeling confident the America Cup will remain in New York. THE THIRD RACE FIXED. A Reuter's telegram from New York on Tues- day evening says :-The third race between the Vigilant and the Valkyrie has been fixed for to- morrow (Wednesday), the damaged bowsprit of the American yacht having been repaired.

TRAGEDY AT BURY ST. EDMUNDS.

IFIVE MEN KILLED BY A DYNAMITE…

THOUSAND MEN DISCHARGED FROM…

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ITHE DUTCH MYSTERY. I

iTERRIBLE SUFFERINGS OFI IA…

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GLAMORGAN J.P.'S,

ITHE CHAMBERLAIN CANARD.

I MORE MISERY PROBABLE.

ITHE CATERHAM SCANDAL.

CONDITION OF CAPTAIN O'SHEA.

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