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A Pastor's P!ea.  A Pastor's Plea. I GAMES AT THE COUNTY SCHOOL. At the annual meeting of the Pupil Teachers' Centre on Thursday, the Rev J. H. Rees, presiding, Mr. J. S. Tregoning, in ac- cordance with notice of motion, raised the question of school fees. The education authorities had raised an objection to the compulsory payment of one shilling per term by the pupils for games. In order to get over the difficulty, lie suggested that the school fees be raised to 31s. a term. This would amount to the same thing in the end. The parents at present paid 30s a term, and also found the shilling for games. Mr. Joseph Roberts seconded the motion. A question of the payment by the scholar- ship pupils was then raised. Mr Tregoning said they would lose all that. The Chairman stated that it was clear they had no power to charge scholarship holders. Mr. Thomas Thomas said he was sorry to have to oppose the motion. He did not agree with making the games fee compulsory. The children, if interested, should make a special effort and contribute themselves. If they made a special effort in that way it would prove a valuable. lesson to them in after life At present the lads got plenty of money from a general fund, and were led to believe that there was a gold mine behind them. He did not think children should go gallivanting about the country playing foot- ball. Only recently he noticed a bill amount- ing to pounds for the repair of footballs alonel It might be necessary, but he did not agree with a compulsory payment. Mr T. Greville said that whilst he did hot altogether agree with Mr. Thomas, he would second the motion. It would be unfair to charge the ordinary students, and allow the scholarship holders to have the games free. The Master said it would facilitate matters if the Clerk collected the fees. The. amount was nearly £80 per annum from the boys and girls together, and he considered that such a financial transaction should go through the accounts. The lads did not go gallivanting about the country, as stated by Mr. Thomas. They were always in charge of a master, and defrayed half the travelling expenses. They always considered it an honour to represent the school. There were payments of three- pence and upwards towards the library and reading-room, and twopence a term for the debating society. Last year they lost Z to £ 0 on the sports, which was made. up in various ways. The scholars also made a con- tribution to the Hospital of 3d. to 6d. each. He could not see that the. proposed charge could make one half-penny difference to the parents. In the- past, there had been no ob- jection on the part of scholarship holders to paying Is for games. Mr. Tregoning said the Board of Education objected to the charge for games being made compulsory. Mr. Thomas Thomas stated that it should be made clea.r to the parents that this' pay- ment was not compulsory, and that they could refuse to pay. The Chajrman said he felt sorry for the children of any parents who refused to con- tribute. Mr. Thomas stated that there were other forms of exercise besides playing football. Mi". Tregoning said the Clerk might stiIl collect the shillings for the games when ap- plying for the school fees, and at the same time make it clear that the fee was not com- pulsory. Mr. Greville said lie was sorry to hear the Chairman support football. He would not do so from the pulpit. The Chairman replied that he did. not wish to be misunderstood. He might inform Mr. Greville that he had advised parents from the pulpit to give their children plenty of exercise. He did not believe, in always keep- ing a boy at his books, and, on the other hand, was quite aware that they might go to the extremes even in exercise- Personally, he was1 prepared to continue paying the games fees for his children. Mr. Greville: said he was satisfied with the explanation, and was glad the Chairman had the courage of his convictions. Ministers preached from the pulpit against football, but in private conversation upheld it. The Chairman suggested that the matter be Peferred to a small committee. Mr. Thomas oaid he would withdraw his motion if it was clearly understood that the fees weare to be voluntary. It was decided that the Clerk collect the games fees as in the. past, but that the parents be informed that they were quit, voluntary, and also that the children who did not pay would not be entitled to join in the games. Mrs Philllps said that would be hard lines for the children.

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